Tom Watson, Agrarian Rebel

By C. Vann Woodward | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER XII
Populism in Congress

WITH APPARENT INTENTION of staying a long while at Washington, Watson bought a house then under construction at 129 Fourth Street, S. E., "a handsome four story brick building," he pronounced it. His family, which now included a son and a daughter, was no sooner moved in than they and he were down with grippe. His reaction to the new situation, like his reaction to his first office ten years before, was one of disappointment. "Being in Congress," he wrote, "does not seem near so big a thing as when I was campaigning for the place." Furthermore, "The speaker [Mr. Crisp] is bitterly hostile to me because I would not support him and will give me no chance to acquit myself with credit." With so much to do, however, there was little time for self-pity. "Am organizing a new political party in Georgia," he noted in his Journal, "because the Democratic Party has drifted away from true Principles and is only seeking office. The newspapers denounce me most bitterly but the people seem to be rallying to me with enthusiasm."1 "I worked so hard while in Congress," he later testified, "that while I am passionately fond of music, I did not once attend the opera."

Before Congress convened a show-down upon the question of adherence to the Indianapolis resolution and independence was forced upon all Alliance-elected and pledged congressmen. A short while before the Democratic caucus was called, a confer

____________________
1
MS. journal 2, p. 527; National Economist, Jan. 2, 1892.

-190-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tom Watson, Agrarian Rebel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 520

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.