Capital, the Communist Manifesto and Other Writings

By Karl Marx; Max Eastman | Go to book overview

Should the German workers be unable to attain the power and the fulfillment of their class interests without going through a whole long revolutionary development, they have at least this time the certainty that the first act of this imminent revolutionary drama will coincide with the direct victory of their own class in France and be thereby greatly accelerated.

But they themselves must do the most for their own ultimate victory, by enlightening themselves about their class interests, by adopting as quickly as possible an independent party position and by refusing for a single instant to be diverted by the hypocritical phrases of the democratic petty bourgeoisie from the independent organization of the party of the proletariat. Their battle cry must be: The Permanent Revolution.

London, in March 1850.


4. The Civil War in France.

INTRODUCTION TO THE GERMAN EDITION

The invitation to prepare another edition of the address of the General Council of the International Workingmen's Association concerning the Civil War in France, and to preface it with an introduction, came to me quite unexpectedly. I can only, therefore, take up the most essential points and touch upon them very briefly.

I prefix the two shorter addresses of the General Council1 to the longer pamphlet on the Franco-Prussian War. Firstly, because in the pamphlet on the Civil War reference is made to the second address, which itself would not be intelligible without the first. Secondly, because these two addresses, which are also the work of Marx, are, not less than the Civil War, excellent specimens of the marvelous gift of the author, first exhibited in the Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, of apprehending clearly the character, the import, and the inevitable consequences of great historical events, at the very time when these events are still unfolding themselves, or have only just taken place. And lastly because, as I write, the Ger

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1
Omitted from this volume. [M.E.]

-367-

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