Louis Napoleon and the Second Empire

By J. M. Thompson | Go to book overview

CHATER II
THE PRETENDER (1831-1840)

HOR. He waxes desperate with imagination. MAR. Let's follow; 'tis not fit thus to obey him. HOR. Have after. To what issue will this come? MAR. Something is rotten in the state of Denmark. HOR. Heaven will direct it. MAR. Nay, let's follow him. Hamlet, I, iv


I

THE five years between Louis' return from London to Arenenberg in August 1831 and his Strasbourg adventure of October 1836 were no doubt 'the least eventful period of his life'; but they were the most important for the growth of his life's purpose -- his dedication to the cause of Bonapartism. Why was this, and what is the evidence for it?

First, the matter of physical and legal succession in the Bonaparte family. For twenty years Louis had been barred from the Napoleonic heritage by his cousin the Duc de Reichstadt and by his elder brother Napoléon-Louis. But now, almost suddenly, both obstacles disappeared. Napoléon-Louis died at Forli in March 1831, the Due de Reichstadt at Vienna on July 22nd, 1832. Up to the end of 1831 Louis was waiting, as he told his father, to see what the head of the family would do; he rejected an invitation to lead a rebellion in Poland, and he gave publicity to a supposed refusal to offer himself for the Belgian throne in 1831. But from 1832 onwards he is set on a course which more and more clearly aims at another 'return from Elba', the overthrow of Louis-Philippe, and the restoration of a Napoleonic Empire.1

The evidence for this lies in Louis own published works: for he made no secret of his ambitions, knowing well that France was deeply discontented with the Orleanist rule, and that Paris at least would always welcome an escape from the double apprehension of a Bourbon restoration or a Red Republic to the security of a Bonapartist regime. In May 1832 Louis published, under the title of Rêveries politiques,2 a pamphlet in which he discussed the best means of regenerating his country. Different suggestions had been made: 'My own belief (he wrote) is that it can only be done by combining those two popular causes, Napoleon II and the Republic. The great

-30-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Louis Napoleon and the Second Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xii
  • Chapter I - THE HEIR (1808-1831) 1
  • Chater II - THE PRETENDER (1831-1840) 30
  • Chapter III - THE OUTLAW (1840-1848) 63
  • Chapter IV - THE PRESIDENT (1848-1852) 97
  • Chapter V - THE EMPEROR (1852-1856) 137
  • Chapter VI - THE LIBERATOR (1856-1859) 167
  • Chapter VII - THE ADVENTURER (1859-1869) 196
  • Chapter VIII - THE LIBERAL (1860-1869) 224
  • Chapter IX - THE GAMBLER (1863-1869) 255
  • Chapter X - THE FATALIST (1869-1870) 287
  • EPILOGUE 314
  • Notes 323
  • Index 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.