Progress and Pragmatism: James, Dewey, Beard, and the American Idea of Progress

By David W. Marcell | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1
1.
Adams to Charles Milnes Gaskell, March 14, 1910, in Worthington Chauncey Ford, ed., The Letters of Henry Adams, 1892- 1918 ( Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1938), 11: 537; Adams to William James, June 20, 1910, Ford, ed., Letters, 543.

Adams wrote on August 2, 1910, to Gaskell: "When I flung my little volume in professional faces last winter, and--so to speak--kicked my American Universities in the stomach as violently and insultingly as I could, I calculated on getting one sharp reaction and protest for every hundred copies of the Letter I sent out. After all, I am the doyen of their School, and they have got to listen to what I tell them. As a matter of fact, every correspondence has taken the tone,--'Why, of course! We know, etc., etc. But, etc. etc.' My poor dear old friend and fellow William James alone has put up some sort of a fight. Society is ready for collectivism; it has no fight left in it; and our class is as defunct as the dodo." Ibid., 546.

At least one other person did respond critically to the Letter, although Adams had not received his reply at the time of his correspondence with James. Henry A. Bumstead, a Yale mathematical physicist, wrote to Adams on June 16, 1910, but his letter had apparently not arrived (or Adams failed to acknowledge it) before his letter of August 2 to Gaskell. See William H. Jordy, Henry Adams: Scientific Historian ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1952), 216n.

2.
Adams to Margaret Chanler, September 9, 1909, in Newton Arvin , ed., The Selected Letters of Henry Adams ( New York: Farrar, Straus, 1951), 263; James to Henry Adams, June 17, 1910, in Henry James, ed., The Letters of William James ( Boston: The Atlantic Monthly Press, 1920), II: 344.
3.
Max I. Baym, "William James and Henry Adams," New England Quarterly 10 ( December 1937): 731.

-335-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Progress and Pragmatism: James, Dewey, Beard, and the American Idea of Progress
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.