Developing Sanity in Human Affairs

By Susan Presby Kodish; Robert P. Holston | Go to book overview

Overview

Martin H. Levinson

The seven presentation in the Education/Counseling theme illustrate how general semantics can usefully be applied and conceptualized at various levels of abstraction. Each successive presentation tends to deal with relating general semantics to higher-level subject matter.

Martin H. Levinson talk, "A General Semantics Approach to Clinical Supervision with Drug Prevention Counselors," shows how general semantics formulations can be employed effectively to challenge and motivate school counselors to think about and do a better job. He uses general semantics to work with the counselors and to help them to work with other school personnel and their clients.

Sanford I. Berman, in "The Irving J. Lee Method of Teaching General Semantics," shares material he has developed, known as Berman quizzes, as well as various aspects of Irving J. Lee's method of teaching general semantics to dynamically illustrate how general semantics, in Berman's own words, can "lessen misunderstanding and help us to better understand."

Professor Roy F. Fox, in "'Got-to-Be, Got-to-Be, Dom-in-o's!': The Semantics of Student Responses to TV Commercials," presents a report of research he conducted. His conclusions indicate that advertisers on Channel One, which broadcasts eight minutes of news and two minutes of commercials for over 12,000 schools in forty-eight states, effectively seem to be getting their messages across to a noncritical audience. We would hope that a bit of general semantics training might help these students become more savvy consumers of advertising propaganda.

Michael Hall provides a theoretical discussion titled An Integrated Model of Alfred Korzybski's General Semantics, Bandler/Grinder'sNeuro-Linguistic Programming

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