Developing Sanity in Human Affairs

By Susan Presby Kodish; Robert P. Holston | Go to book overview

21
An Integrated Model of Alfred Korzybski's General Semantics, Bandler/Grinder's Neuro-Linguistic Programming, Ellis's Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, and Glasser's Reality Therapy/Control Theory 1

Michael Hall

Alfred Korzybski called for a process language--one that would overcome the limitations of a linear, static language. Since his formulations in general semantics, several cognitive psychologies (rational emotive behavior therapy [REBT], neuro-linguistic programming [NLP], reality therapy/control theory [RT/CT]) have followed suit and have suggested various methods and technologies for moving away from a static Aristotelian language to a more functional, behavioristic language. These psychologies, like general semantics, seek to provide a way to language (or code our representations) so that we generate a sense of process and of the movement of process reality.

What effect do these formulations have for everyday life? Primarily they empower people to mentally code their thinking and representing of reality in ways that reflect a more true-to-fact mapping. To the extent that these linguistic shifts provide a linguistic remapping, or relanguaging, to that extent they contribute to bringing more sanity, clarity and transformational power to the human race.

In this paper, I present three therapy models with which I have become intimately acquainted and relate them to the basic ideas of general semantics: first, the model that William Glasser developed RT/CT; second, REBT of Albert Ellis with his list of cognitive distortions that make for unsanity (or neurosis); and third, the model John Grinder and Richard Bandler created from Korzybski's formulations--NLP. I will then suggest a way to integrate some of the linguistic distinctions of these models that would provide us an even more extensive list of relanguaging shifts. These allow one to operate with a greater "consciousness of abstracting" as envisioned by Korzybski.

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