Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION: EASTERN EUROPE

The concept, the title of this introduction, is not entirely a geographic one. Historians, geographers, and political scientists cannot fully agree whether Eastern Europe should include the landmass usually referred to as European Russia--and today, also Ukraine--the arbitrarily defined territory between the ever-changing western borders of the state of the former tsars, and then the commissars, on the one hand, and the Ural mountains on the other. The political boundaries of Eastern Europe have also been controversial. Should they include, for instance, the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania? How about the Balkan dates? Should Greece be included in the concept? Not surprisingly, a number of terms have been used to describe the region, such as Central Europe, East Central Europe, and, of course, Eastern Europe. East Central Europe has usually referred only to Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. Central Europe usually included Germany, Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia. Eastern Europe has included Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and European Russia. What is certain, however, is that Austria, that leftover state of the defunct Habsburg empire, which, by rights of geography, and history should be part of Eastern Europe, is not. The safest way to handle the problem of definition is to include in the region all the countries that were part of the colonial empire of the Soviet Union in the second half of the twentieth century. Complicating the situation will be the fact that the list will include East Germany--the so-called German Democratic Republic (GDR)--and the southeast European countries of the Balkans, including Romania, the former Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Albania. The current volume will, therefore, take this "easy way" out of the dilemma of definition.

Once the definition of the dimensions of Eastern Europe is accepted, further problems will intrude into our deliberations. The concept of Eastern Europe is a relatively new one from the historical perspective. The peoples of this amorphously defined region have considered themselves Europeans without any qualifying adjectives. The term "East Europeans" was never used to refer to them until World War I. Furthermore, the designation denotes a homogeneity that has never existed--not when the region was controlled by the three great empires of the Ottoman Turks, the Russian

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of East European History since 1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 514

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.