Dictionary of East European History since 1945

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Czechoslovakia). His outspoken criticism of the whole system earned him expulsion from the Communist party. In 1969, Sik emigrated to Germany where he continues his studies today.


Bibliography

Kusin Vladimir V., From Dubcek to Charter 77. A Study of 'Normalization' in Czechoslovakia, 1968-1978 ( New York, 1978).

Siroky, William, (1902-1089). Siroky became a member of the Czechoslovak Communist party in 1921, and he served as a member of various regional party committees. He was a member of the party's Central Committee between 1930 and 1938. In 1935, he was elected to the Czechoslovak parliament on the Communist party ticket. In 1938, he was regional party secretary in Bratislava in Slovakia. When Germany invaded the Czech lands, Siroky escaped at first to France and then he went to the Soviet Union. In 1941, he returned to his homeland only to be arrested by the Nazis almost immediately. He was very lucky and managed to escape, and he ended up once again in Moscow. After the end of World War II, Siroky returned home and served, until 1953, as deputy prime minister. He was already a member of parliament and of the party's Politburo. Between 1950 and 1953 he was minister of foreign affairs and was prime minister of Czechoslovakia between 1953 and 1963. In 1968, he was dismissed and expelled from the Presidium (formerly the Politburo) of the party, and in May of that year his party membership was suspended. The Warsaw Pact invasion ended the suspension, but Siroky never returned to active party life.


Bibliography

Skilling Gordon H., Czechoslovakia's Interrupted Revolution ( Princeton, NJ., 1976).

Slansky Trial. Rudolf Slansky was among the early members of the Czechoslovak Communist party. When Germany invaded the Czech lands, Slansky left for the Soviet Union and spent several years there in exile. While in Moscow, he befriended Klement Gottwald who later became the general secretary of the Czechoslovak Communist party. In 1944, Slansky was sent back to Czechoslovakia to participate in the Slovak uprising against the Germans. A cold man, a narrow-minded dogmatic communist, he was totally devoted to Marxism-Leninism and to Stalin. After the Rajktrial in Hungary, Matyas Rakosi, the Hungarian general secretary, urged Gottwald to follow the Hungarian's lead and purge the Czechoslovak Communist party of "subversive" elements. But Gottwald dragged his feet, until Stalin personally intervened and sent some KGB "experts" to arrange the Czechoslovak show trials.

With the help of KGB general Likachev, preparations began for a trial of Vladimir Clementis and Gustav Husak, (see Husak, Gustav), Slovak communists, who were to be accused of nationalism. Slansky himself selected them for this role in order to "prove" that Titoism in Slovakia was alive and that Slovak Titoists were preparing the overthrow of the socialist state and the separation of Slovakia.

By the winter of 1950, however, Stalin obviously believed that the anti-Tito cam

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