Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Dennis Mike, German Democratic Republic: Politics, Economics, Society ( London, 1988); Steele Jonathan, Inside East Germany: The State That Came in from the Cold ( New York, 1977).

Grotewohl Otto (1893-1964). ( Grotewohl, the son of a master tailor, became a book binder. He studied at the Hochschulefur Politik, a college maintained by the German Social Democratic party in Berlin. Between 1925 and 1933, Grotewohl was chairman of the Braunschweig branch of the German Social Democratic party and, at the same time, served as a deputy in the Reichstag. He was also president of a social democrat- run enterprise, the Land Insurance Institute. He was briefly imprisoned in 1933 after Hitler's accession to power, then he was released and worked as a tradesmen.

In 1945, he was elected chairman of the Social Democratic party in the Soviet zone. He favored close cooperation with the communists, and guided his part of the Social Democratic party to the merger with the communists in 1946. At the time of the merger, the social democrats had 620,000 members. Grotewohl expected to remain in control of the leadership of the Socialist Unity party, since he had been the leader of the Social Democratic party. This was, of course, not to be. Since the communists received close support from the Soviet occupational authorities, their dominance in the united party was assured. In 1949, the parity-principle, meaning that there was to be an equal number of social democrats and communists in the party's leadership, was shelved. This was a great disappointment to the aging social democrat Grotewohl who shared leadership with Wilhehm Pieck (see Pleck, Wilhelm). He was gradually pushed into the background, and real authority simply slipped out of his hands. Even the illusion of power was stripped from him.

In 1949, a new Politburo was set up with seven full-and two candidate (nonvoting) members. It created its own secretariat which was, of course, controlled by the communists. Grotewohl and Pieck were named to membership in the Politburo but Walter Ulbricht (see Ulbricht, Walter), the secretary general of the Communist party, had the real power.

In October 1949, the first government of the German Democratic Republic ( East Germany) was created out of the Soviet occupational zone. Otto Grotewohl was named president of the republic, which was nothing more than an honorific title. He held this post until his death in 1964. His deputies included Walter Ulbricht, Otto Nuschke (of the Christian Democratic Union whose leadership had already been purged by the communists), and a Professor Kastner, a member of the Liberal party. The cabinet had a ten-to-six majority of communists. Kastner was later recruited by the West German intelligence services, and he eventually escaped to the West with his wife who was also a West German intelligence agent.


Bibliography

Dennis Mike, German, Democratic Republic: Politics, Economics, Society ( London, 1988.); Nettle Jonathan P., The Eastem Zone and Soviet Policy in Germany ( London, 1951);

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of East European History since 1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 514

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.