Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview
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But Rakosi was deposed by the Soviet leaders, and the revolution ended an era in Hungary. Aczel was among those who supported the revolution's premier, Imre Nagy (see Nagy, Imre). After the revolution was suppressed, Tamas Aczel had fled to England where, in collaboration with Tibor Meray, he wrote one of the most penetrating analyses of the revolution and its causes. In the 1960s, Aczel emigrated to the United States and became a professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.


Bibliography

Aczel Tamas, and Meray Tibor, The Revolt of the Mind ( London, 1961).

Andics, Erzsebet (1902-1986). Andics joined the Hungarian Communist party at its inception in 1918, and she was an active party member in her teens during the first Soviet Republic in Hungary. After the suppression of the Soviet Republic by Romanian troops in August 1919, Andics escaped and went to the Soviet Union. She was sent back to Hungary by the COMINTERN but was caught quickly, arrested, and tried. She received a sentence of fifteen years in prison. However, she spent only one year in jail: she was exchanged for some Hungarian military officers who had been captured during World War I, and kept in the Soviet Union after the Russian Revolution.

She spent the rest of the interwar and World War II years in the Soviet Union. After 1945, she returned to Hungary and served in various party- and government posts. Between 1948 and 1956, she was a member of the Politburo. After the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, Andics became a departmental chairperson of the Humanities at Eotvos Lorant University in Budapest. She was a rabid communist, who had rigidly adhered to Marxism-Leninism-Stalinism both as a functionary and as a teacher.


Bibliography

Aczel Tamas, and Meray Tibor, The Revolt of the Mind ( London, 1961).

Antall, Jozsef (1930-1994). Antall was born to a family of civil servants and attended Lorant Eotvos University in Budapest. He never joined the Communist party. In the 1980s, Antall was the director of a museum in Budapest. He had splendid family traditions. His father was active in the antifascist movement during World War II and was successful in saving several Jewish families from the Nazi extermination camps. He was a member of the Smallholders party and, after 1945, a member of the democratic coalition government that existed all too briefly in Hungary. He was the minister of reconstruction, an important post in war-ravaged Hungary. With the victory of the communists, Antall's father was, of course, cashiered, but his antifascist past probably saved him from persecution.

The younger Antall joined the Smallholders party when the communist system was beginning to totter in Hungary in 1988, but eventually he chose the Hungarian Democratic Forum. When the Democratic Forum, together with its coalition partners, the Smallholder party and the Christian Democratic People's party, won a parliamentary

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