Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview

majority in the first free elections held after communist rule in 1990, Antall was chosen prime minister of Hungary. He created his cabinet by appointing eight ministers from the ranks of the Democratic Forum--some of them his personal friends and relatives--four from the Smallholders party, one from the Christian Democrats, and two independents.

His government reflected the party alignments; it was center-right with a good dose of nationalist, some anti-Semitic, and populist sentiments. Antall's governing style, as he had defined it, was that of "the calm power." In real life, however, this had meant procrastination and the inability to put through his government program in paliarment. He suffered from brain cancer and the continuous treatments that he had received, obviously affected his performance. He had attempted to unite the three major trends in the Democratic Forum, namely, the populist, the nationalist, and the liberal, but without much success. The popularity of the Antall-government after the 1990 elections had taken a nose dive. In December, 1993, Antall suddenly died. He left behind a demoralized party who is unlikely to succeed in the upcoming elections in May, 1994.


Bibliography

Pataki Judith, "Hungarian Govermment Midway through its First Term," Radio Free Europe Research Report 1.24 ( June 12, 1992), pp. 18-24; Racz Barnabas, "The Hungarian Parliament's Rise and Challenges," Radio Free Europe Research Report 1.7 ( February 14, 1992), pp. 22-26;. Reisch Alfred. "Roundtable: Hungary's Parliament in Transition," Radio Free Europe Research Report 1.48 ( December 4, 1992), pp. 27-35.

Bata, Istvan (1910-). Bata was a manual worker in a ship-building factory in Budapest. A skilled craftsman, he was involved with trade union activities during the interwar years, and he joined the Hungarian Communist party in 1945. In 1953, during Imre Nagy's (see Nagy, Imre) first premiership, Bata was appointed minister of defense. In October 1956, he escaped from the revolution and took refuge in the Soviet Union. In 1958, he returned to Hungary but no longer participated in political activities. In 1959, he was appointed chief of a railroad station.


Bibliography

Aczel Tamas, and Meray Tibor, The Revolt of the Mind ( London, 1961).

"B" Lists in Post-World War II Hungary. In 1945 and 1946, the provisional government of Hungary intended to exclude from the state bureaucracy the fascist sympathizers and others who had served the interwar regime all too willingly. Thus, the government devised a method, the so-called "B" list, to weed out undesirables from public offices. However, it soon became obvious that the system was being used by the communists, who increasingly dominated politics, simply to get rid of people who were not supportive of the Communist party. According to first estimates, about 100,000 people were to be discharged. However, no provision was made for their reemployment, and most of them were simply put out on the streets. In time, the "B"

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