Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview

the future of Hungary. This meeting represented a catharsis for the movement, similar to what happened to another populist movement, the German Independent Youth movement in 1913 at the Hohe Meisner. In both cases, a lot of talk led to no action. During World War II, especially after Hungary was occupied by the Germans in March 1944, young populists joined the resistance. They were led by brave young men such as Sandor Kis and Pal Jonas, both of whom were to play major roles immediately after the end of the war in Hungarian politics. Both were eventually forced to leave Hungary by the communists. The populists' program was used to some extent by the communists after 1945, to win the peasantry over to their side. But the populists were simply brushed aside and were not given leading roles in politics and society.

After 1989, the populists reemerged and moved more to the right of the political spectrum. Some of their leaders, such as, for instance, Istvan Csurka, became outspoken, racist-nationalists with a large following. They represent an extreme that threatens Hungary's progress toward democracy.


Bibliography

Borbandi Gyula, Der Ungarische Populismus ( Mainz, 1976); Oltay Edith, "Hungary: Csurka Launches National Movement," Radio Free Europe Research Report 2.13 ( March 26, 1993), pp. 25-31.

Pozsgay, Imre ( 1933- ). Pozsgay was of the generation that hardly knew any system but socialism He grew up in Somogy county where he joined the Hungarian Socialist Workers party and became a small time apparatchik. In 1970, he began his rise in the communist apparatus. In that year, he was appointed a member of the party's Central Committee, in charge of the operations of the Patriotic People's Front. Two years later, he joined Janos Kadar's (see Kadar, Janos) cabinet as minister of education and immediately introduced a series of reforms in the stagnant educational system.

Pozsgay soon sought contact with the populist writers who had been relegated to the background by the regime. He also became friendly with intellectuals who were chafing under the restrictive policies of the regime. Pozsgay used the front as a shield for nonconformist intellectuals and encouraged them to step over the limits set by Gyorgy Aczel (see Aczel, Gyorgy), the ideological guru of the Kadar government.

By the mid- 1980s, Pozsgay had become the spokesman for reform communists. In 1988, he shocked the Kadar regime when he declared that the "events" of 1956 represented a genuine popular uprising against an oppressive system.

By the end of the 1980s, Pozsgay was in the forefront of reform communists, urging the party leaders to abandon their monopoly of political power and to move toward the establishment of a pluralistic democracy. In 1989, Pozsgay was one of those who engineered the dissolution of the Hungarian Socialist Workers party. He became a leading spokesman for the new Hungarian Socialist party that separated from the hard-liners.

Pozsgay ran for the presidency of the new Hungarian republic; however, he was

-287-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of East European History since 1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 514

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.