Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview

POLAND

General Information . Area: 312,677 square kilometers (120,725 square miles). Population: 37,811,000 in 1988. Urban dwellers: 60 percent of the people; 40 percent live in rural areas. GNP: $65 billion. Railroad network: 23,707 kilometers in 1985. Road network: 153,000 kilometers. Ethnicity: 98 percent Polish, 35,000 Jews, 300,000 Belorussians, 25,000 Gypsies. Borders: In the north, Poland sits on the Baltic sea; in the east, it borders on Latvia, Lithuania, and Russia: in the west, the Oder- Neisse line separates Poland from Germany; in the south, Poland borders on Slovakia and the Czech Republic. Major cities: Warsaw, the capital city, Lodz, Cracow, Wroclaw, Poznan, Gdansk. Geography: The land is mostly flat, except in the southwest where the Carpathian Mountains separate Poland from Slovakia and the Czech republic.


Bibliography

Korbonski Andrzej, "Poland, 1918-1990," in Joseph Held, ed. The Columbia History of Eastern Europe in the Twentieth Century ( New York, 1992), pp. 229-276; Halecki Oscar, Poland ( New York, 1955); Heymann Frederick G., Poland and Czechoslovakia ( New York, 1965); Morrison James E, The Polish People's Republic ( Baltimore, MD, 1968).


CHRONOLOGY
1944August. After encouraging the Polish Home Army to begin its uprising
against the Germans in Warsaw, the Red Army stopped its advance and per-
mitted the Germans to destroy the Home Army in addition to leveling the Pol-
ish capital.
1945January. Soviet troops entered what was left of Warsaw.
April. The Lublin Committee of National Liberation, a group of Polish com-
munists who were in the Soviet Union during the war, signed a treaty of
friendship and cooperation with the Soviet Union. The Soviet government
gave its recognition to the Lublin Committee as the provisional government
of Poland.
June. The provisional government of Poland formed a cabinet with twenty-
one ministers. Sixteen ministers came from the Lublin Committee; five from
the Polish government in exile in London.

-301-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of East European History since 1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 514

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.