Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview
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the Roundtable (see Roundtable Talks in Poland) discussions. In 1988, Solidarity was reinstated with full rights, and, in a semi-free election held in June 1989, its candidates won every contest against communist representatives. After the elections, the first government, dominated by Solidarity members, was formed under the prime ministership of Tadeusz Mazowiecki. In the presidential elections of 1990, Walesa won after a runoff. He is now the president of the Polish republic.


Bibliography

Andrews Nicholas G., Poland, 1980-1981: Solidarity Versus the Party. ( Washington, DC, 1985, Ash Timothy Garton, The Polish Revolution: Solidarity, 1980-1982 ( London, 1983); Barker Colin, Festival of the Oppressed: Solidarity, Reform, and Revolution in Poland 1980-1981 ( London, 1986); Blazyca George, and Rapacki Ryszard, eds. Poland into the 1990s: Economy and Society in Transition ( New York, 1991); Brandys Kazimierz, A Warsaw Diary, 1978-1981 ( London, 1984); Kemp-Welch Anthony, The Birth of Solidarity: The Gdansk Negotiations, 1980 ( London, 1983); Misztal Bronislaw, Poland after Solidarity. Social Movements Versus the State ( New Brunswick, NJ, 1985); Persky Stanislaw, and Flam, H. , eds. The Solidarity Sourcebook ( Vancouver, 1982); Potel Jean Y., The Promise of Solidarity ( New York, 1982).

Strzelecki, Ryszard (1907-1982). The son of an industrial worker who studied and became a mechanical engineer, Strzelecki joined the communist guerrilla army in Poland in 1944, and he became its chief of staff. After 1945, he served in various governmental and party posts. When Wladislaw Gomulka (see Gomulka, Wladislaw) was arrested in 1951, Strzelecki adopted the fallen leader's son as his own, earning Gomulka's gratitude. In January 1960, he was appointed a member of the Central Committee of the Polish United Workers party. In 1956, he became minister of railways. In the late 1970s, however, Strzelecki became seriously ill and could no longer participate in political or governmental activities.


Bibliography

Polonsky Antony, and Druiker Boleslaw, The Beginnings of Communist Rule in Poland ( London, 1980).

Suchocka, Hanna (1946- ). Suchocka's parents inherited a pharmacy from their parents in Pleszew, near Poznan. The pharmacy was nationalized in 1951. Suchocka graduated in law at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan in 1968. She taught for one year in the school's constitutional law department but she was pressured to join the Communist party. Instead, she joined the Democratic party, a communist satellite, designed to draw middle-class intellectuals into politics on behalf of the communist ideology. In 1972, she was appointed a full-time lecturer at the university. She completed her doctorate in 1975. She was elected to membership in the Polish Academy of Sciences, and she has been lecturing regularly at the Catholic University of Lublin.

Between 1980 and 1985, Suchocka was a parliamentary deputy for the Democratic party. She joined Solidarity (see Solidarity Trade Union of Poland) in 1980. In

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