Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview
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politicians of rump- Yugoslavia, offering his "good services" to solve the murderous conflict.
June. Ian Van der Stoel, high commissioner for the Council of Europe, visited Romania to investigate the ethnic situation in the country; however, he was not scheduled to talk with ethnic representatives. The Romanian parliament established a special commission to investigate allegations of new corruption in the ministries. A Romanian military delegation visited Washington, D.C. and conferred with General Colin Powell. Two major trade unions merged, with a combined membership of 3 million. Romanian foreign minister Teodor Melescanu visited Budapest and held discussions with Geza Jeszenszky, his Hungarian counterpart. Afterward he travelled to Holland on an official visit. Mhai Botez, a former Romanian dissident who received asylum in the United States during the Ceausescu regime, was named Romania's ambassador to the United Nations.

Apostol, Gheorghe (1912-). Apostol's father was a railroad worker, and he found employment at the Romanian railways. He joined the illegal Communist party in 1930, and spread the party's message while traveling throughout the country. Apostol was discovered and arrested by the royal police, and he spent the rest of the interwar years in prison. Most of the local leaders of the Communist party were incarcerated in that same jail, and, therefore, they had ample opportunity to communicate with each other. It is likely that Apostol, together with other leaders, taught Marxism-Leninism to a young man, really a boy, who was locked up with them for acting as a courier for the party. He was Nicolae Ceausescu (see Ceausescu, Nicolae), nineteen years old at that time. The communist leaders in prison included Gheorghe Gherghiu-Dej (see Gheorghiu-Dej, Gheorghe), the later leader of the party after the Stalinization of Romania; Chivu Stoica; Alexandru Moghioros; and others. They were destined to play important roles in the Stalinization of Romania after 1944.

When Gheorghiu-Dej died of cancer in 1965, the candidates for the succession included Apostol. The struggle was won by Ceausescu who gradually reduced his competitors to impotence. In 1968, the new leader ordered the rehabilitation of several of the former leaders who had been purged and executed in the 1950s, including Lucretiu Patrascanu (see Patrascanu, Lucretiu) and Stefan Foris. Apostol's complicity in these judicial murders was revealed. He was discredited and eventually removed from the Communist party's highest organ, the Politburo (renamed the Presidium). He was shunted off to Brazil as Romanian ambassador and later sent to represent the Romanian state in Argentina. He survived the Ceausescus and is currently living in retirement.


Bibliography

Graham Lawrence S., Romania: A Developing Socialist State ( Boulder, CO, 1982); Shafir Michael , Romania: Politics, Economics and Society ( Boulder, CO, 1985).

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