Dictionary of East European History since 1945

By Joseph Held | Go to book overview

eral Executive Council, and, in 1962, he became a member of the Federal Executive Council. In 1974, Gligorov became the president of the federal parliament of Yugoslavia. He was also a professor at the University of Belgrade.

Gligorov served as a member of the Central Committee of the League of Yugoslav Communists. In 1991, he became the president of the Republic of Macedonia, and directed the country to its independence.


Bibliography

Perry Duncan M., "Politics in the Republic of Macedonia: Issues and Parties," Radio Free Europe Research Report 2.23 ( June 4, 1993), pp. 31-37.

Hebrang, Andrej (1899-1948). Hebrang was born in Croatia and his family background is unknown. He became a communist activist in the Yugoslav trade union movement. In 1928, he was arrested, tried, and sentenced to twelve years in prison. Released in 1940, he rejoined the Communist party and, in 1941, he joined Tito's (see Tito, Josip Broz) partisans as the secretary of the Croatian branch of the Yugoslav Communist party. During World War II, Hebrang was a constant member of Tito's headquarters, participating in the presidium of the Partisan Army of Liberation Council. In the first federal government, Hebrang was appointed minister of industry, a key area of Yugoslavia's development. In 1945, he was also a member of the Constituent Assembly and the Croatian Constitutional Assembly. In 1946, he participated in the Stalinization of Yugoslavia as the chairman of the federal planning board.

Later in the year, however, he took over the federal ministry of light industry, and his post in the planning apparatus was given to Boris Kidric (see Kidric, Boris).

By that time, Hebrang had lost favor with Tito. A special commission, set up to investigate his wartime activities, found that he had shown cowardice during the war. He was also charged with collaborating with the Croatian Ustashi, a charge that was patently false. He was also charged with being a "fractionalist" and an individualist who refused to follow the party line. The Central Committee of the Communist party severely reprimanded Hebrang and stripped him of his post as minister of light industry. In 1948, Hebrang was probably against the break with the Soviet Union. He was allegedly arrested while trying to flee the country through Romania. An official statement announced that he had committed suicide, however, it is more than likely that he was murdered in prison.


Bibliography

Avakumovic Ivan, History of the Communist Party of Yugoslavia ( Aberdeen, England, 1964); Byrnes Robert F., Yugoslavia ( New York, 1957).

Jovanovic, Blaza (1907-). A Montenegrine, Jovanovic was born into a family of intellectuals. He was a noted Communist party activist in Montenegro during the interwar years, and he was involved with the organization of the local partisan resistance during the German occupation. In 1952, Jovanovic was elected to membership in the Central Committee of the Yugoslav Communist party, then renamed the League

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