Dictionary of East European History since 1945

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counted for less than 10 percent. Part of this decline resulted from the emigration of Serbs from the province. There was also an Albanian national revival, fueled by the unemployed native intelligentsia who, trained only in its own language, could not find jobs outside the province. The local Serbs, on the other hand, were frustrated by the fact that they could hardly conduct business in the province because they did not want to learn Albanian.

In 1981, there were mass demonstrations all over Kosovo province against Serbian oppression. The federal government responded by force. The Albanians demanded the establishment of their own republic; the Serb authorities feared for the lives of the Serbian minority. If such a republic were established, the Serbs feared, it would eventually merge with Albania. The Albanians, on the other hand, demanded that the principle of national self-determination be recognized. The Albanians of Kosovo are, at the time of this writing ( 1993) waiting for the end of the civil war in the former Yugoslavia. If the Serb nationalists decide to "cleanse" Kosovo of its Albanian population, this might result in a general Balkan war in which besides Serbia, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, and Albania would all participate. Such a war would dwarf the Bosnian conflict in bitterness and casualties.


Bibliography

Adrejovich Milan, "The Radioalization of Serbian Politics," Radio Free Europe Research Report 2. 13 ( March 26, 1993), pp. 14-24; Lydell Harold, Yugoslavia in Crisis ( Oxford, 1989, Shoup Paul S., Communism and the Yugoslav National Question ( New York, 1968); Stojkovic Ljubisa, and Martic Milos, National Minorities in Yugoslavia ( Belgrade, 1952); Zanga Louis, "The Question of Kosovar Sovereignty," Radio Free Europe Research Report, 1. 43 ( October 30, 1992), pp. 21-26.

Kreacic, Otmar ( 1913-). Colonel General Kreacic was born a Croat and attended elementary and some secondary schooling in Zagreb. In 1937, Kreacic joined the Communist party and went to Spain to fight in the Spanish civil war. In 1941, he joined Tito's Partisan army and had various command assignments. By 1945, he had risen to the rank of colonel general. In 1946, Kreacic became a member of the general staff of the Yugoslav army. In the same year, he attended the Fnmze Military Academy in the Soviet Union.

When he returned, he was put in charge of the political department of the general staff. In 1948, when Tito (see Tito, Josip Broz) was reviled by the Soviet and East European communist leadership, Kreacic was Tito's most vocal defender. He made sure that the COMINFORM could never seriously penetrate the Yugoslav armed forces. In 1952, he was appointed a member of the Central Committee of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia (the new name for the Communist party) as well as of the People's Front. He remained in active service until the death of Tito, when he retired to private life.


Bibliography

Byrnes Robert F., Yugoslavia ( New York, 1957); Gow James, Legitimacy and the Military:The Yugoslav Crisis

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