Germany: a Self-Portrait: A Collection of German Writings from 1914 to 1943

By Harlan R. Crippen | Go to book overview
Save to active project

tionalists. His murderers were allowed to escape to Hungary--while the police followed a really remarkable number of false clues--and there were given refuge on the estate of Julius Goemboes until the storm blew over.

A little less than a year later, on 24 June 1922, Foreign Minister Walter Rathenau was murdered by Lieutenants Erwin Kern and Hermann Fischer, also members of the Ehrhardt Brigade. Rathenau, a prominent Jewish industrialist, had, as foreign minister, been steering the Republic on a course of international co-operation and understanding--with Soviet Russia as well as the western powers. He opposed extreme nationalism, warning the Germans that they were no master race. He attempted to secure an adjustment of the tangled reparations question through understanding rather than provocation. Although a man of great wealth, he considered social reforms necessary and spoke against 'the hereditary enslavement of the lower classes.' He was one of the few moderate German statesmen with a positive policy and yet capable of winning popular support. His murderers committed suicide at Saaleck Castle in Thuringia to become 'heroic martyrs' of the budding fascist movement.

Rathenau's death came as a profound shock to Germany. Once more the force of the lost revolution asserted itself, giving the Republic a chance to grasp and profit by its strength. The people rushed into the streets of the cities, trying to show how they felt and seeking some way of destroying the menace which hung over them. The Government feared them more than murderers and was relieved when they returned bewildered and exasperated to their homes. The aimless drift towards catastrophe went on.


BLACK ARMIES

from The Outlaws by ERNST VON SALOMON, translated by Ian F. D. Morrow

SOMETHING was brewing in the country. There was one army which had to be disbanded on account of the peace treaty, and another secret army which began mobilizing. Commissions were abroad in the land, consisting of obsequious individuals in frock

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Germany: a Self-Portrait: A Collection of German Writings from 1914 to 1943
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 482

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?