Germany: a Self-Portrait: A Collection of German Writings from 1914 to 1943

By Harlan R. Crippen | Go to book overview
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of the Right was the Economic Party, made up of small shopkeepers and independent artisans, with anti-Semitism the dominant element in its platform. As the crisis developed, the People's Party went into decline, and the Economic Party began to be swallowed up by the Nazis. The playing back and forth, the maneuvering which had taken place during stabilization between Stresemann and Hugenberg, now began between Hugenberg and Hitler. The emergence of the National Socialist Party as the main body of reaction was signalized by the fact that the industrialists, who had previously limited themselves to encouragement and financial support of Hitler, began to participate directly in party affairs. The most prominent of Hitler's new adjutants was the steel magnate Fritz Thyssen. His conversion, although he had been associated with the Nazis since 1923, was evidence of the feeling among Germany's economic rulers that democracy could be tolerated no longer.
THE PROGRAM OF THE NATIONAL SOCIALIST GERMAN WORKERS' PARTY
THE PROGRAM of the German Workers' Party is limited as to period. The leaders have no intention, once the aims announced in it have been achieved, of setting up fresh ones, merely in order to increase the discontent of the masses artificially and so ensure the continued existence of the party.
1. We demand the union of all Germans to form a Great Germany on the basis of the right of self-determination of nations.
2. We demand equality of rights for the German people in its dealings with other nations, and abolition of the Peace Treaties of Versailles and Saint-Germain.
3. We demand land and territory [colonies] for the nourishment of our people and for settling our surplus population.
4. None but members of the nation [Volksgenossen] may be citizens of the State. None but those of German blood, whatever their creed, may be members of the nation. No Jew, therefore, may be a member of the nation.

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