American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

In keeping with his first objective, Allen published a number of editorials in which he defended the lifestyle, hard work, curriculum, and severe discipline for which the nonreservation schools were noted. He also published a number of articles on Indian education in general, teaching methods, the value of kindergarten, education for "efficiency," and susceptibility of the Indian to education, and in one essay he pointed out the "superiority" of Indian education to that of whites. He lauded the work of Estelle Reel, Superintendent of Indian Education.

In keeping with his second objective, Allen published articles on Albuquerque and the surrounding region, individual Indians (historical and contemporary), the six pueblos under the jurisdiction of the Albuquerque Indian School Superintendency, traditional customs of the Navajos and Pueblos, religious practices, farming methods, lifestyles and conditions of various tribes and Pueblos, and archaeological sites. Allen also published traditions, tales, and folklore of the Southwestern tribes and accounts of festivals and ceremonials. To encourage "progress," he frequently published pieces urging "right" action and "right" thinking to ensure success. And to demonstrate "progress," he occasionally published articles on Indians in the work force.

The Albuquerque Indian was also a school newsletter. Each issue contained columns relating news of the school in general and of the classrooms in particular.

In the May, 1906, issue, Allen announced in a rather bitter editorial that he was passing the publication on to the next administration at the Albuquerque school. He had been relieved and was to be transferred to Haskell Institute, and his printer was to be transferred to the Phoenix Indian School. But a note inserted by the printer stated that Allen had died suddenly on May 26 of diabetes and nervous strain from "the long investigation of troubles" of employees at the school.

The Albuquerque Indian ceased publication with Allen's death. Though shortlived, it contains editorials that clearly describe the rigors of the boarding school discipline and the superintendent's strict control over deed and word that, though left unsaid, existed in the other boarding schools as well.


Note
1.
The Albuquerque Indian, 1 ( June 1, 1905), 10.

Information Sources

Bibliography: None

Index Sources: None

Location Sources: Danky and Hady; HFL; OCLC 5290339. Microprint: Clearwater


Publication History

Title and Title Changes: The Albuquerque Indian ( 1905- 1906)

Volume and Issue Data: The Albuquerque Indian (Vol. 1, No. 1, June 1, 1905-Vol. 1, No. 12, May, 1906)

-9-

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