American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

of their land. By 1910, thousands were landless, and most were burdened with disease and poverty. Indian policy was not working and clearly needed reform.

The Society of American Indians represented a pan-Indian effort at popularizing the need for reform. The reform it called for was conservative and mainly legal. It advocated assimilation and the full rights of citizenship for Indians but called for continuation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, though seriously reorganized. These views of needed reform were too conservative for people like Carlos Montezuma, whose Wassaja* aimed at abolishing the Indian Bureau, and for groups like the Mission Indian Federation in California. The differing viewpoints among Indians regarding the direction reforms should take are evident in The American Indian Magazine. These differences reflect growing Indian activism for reform. In a little more than a decade after the magazine ceased publication in 1920, the controversial reform Indian policy formulated by John Collier and others during the 1920s would become official and would initiate the Indian New Deal. Although the cultural pluralism advocated in Collier's policy was not what The American Indian Magazine sought, the magazine reflects the early stirrings of the reform effort among Indians and is a tangible expression of their determination to achieve it.


Notes
1.
Henry Standing Bear, Hiram Chase, Charles A. Eastman, John M. Oskison, William Holmes, Marie Baldwin, Frank Wright, Howard E. Gansworth, Dennison Wheelock, J. E. Shields, Emma J. Goulette, Rosa B. LaFlesche, Thomas L. Sloan, and Charles E. Dagenett were members of the General Committee. For a history of the Society of American Indians and of The American Indian Magazine, see Hazel W. Hertzberg, The Search for an American Identity: Modern Pan-Indian Movements ( Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1971), 59-193.
2.
Society of American Indians (n.p., 1912), 1.
3.
Ibid., 4.
4.
Parker continued as an archaeologist for the New York State Museum until 1925. From 1925 to 1946, he was the director of the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences. Parker held a number of editorial positions: the Transactions of the New York State Archaeological Association ( 1916- 1955), Museum Service ( 1926- 1945), Research Records ( 1926- 1946), Galleon ( 1949- 1950), and The Builder ( 1949- 1955). He was involved in numerous civic affairs, he was a practicing ethnologist, and he wrote extensively. Parker died on January 1, 1955. Marion E. Gridley (comp. and ed.), Indians of Today ( Chicago: Millar Publishing Company, 1947), 68-70; "Arthur Caswell Parker," Who Was Who in America ( Chicago: Marquis--Who's Who, 1960), 3: 664.
5.
In 1926, Bonnin founded the National Council of American Indians. During the next several years, she lectured and worked for reform in Indian affairs. She died in Washington on January 25, 1938, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Gridley (comp. and ed.), Indians of Today ( Chicago, 1936), 19; Frederick J. Dockstader, Great North American Indians ( New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1977), 40-41.

Information Sources

Bibliography: None

Index Sources: None

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 486

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.