American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

under the heading of "Daybreak," containing poetry, church news, inspirational material, and convocation reports.

In the summer of 1925, Anpao was moved to Springfield, South Dakota, where it was edited by the Reverends John K. Burleson and Paul H. Barbour at Springfield and Levi M. Rouillard (Sioux) at Rapid City. John Flockhart was business manager. Burleson, ordained in 1896, taught theology at St. Mary's at Springfield. Barbour went to Springfield in 1925 to take charge of the Santee Mission, which he administered until 1930 when he moved to Rosebud. 4 In 1927, the editors dropped the English-language page. Content consisted mainly of news of schools, agencies, and missions. Letters appeared less frequently. In 1928, Burleson left the paper, and in 1929, H. H. Whipple of Greenwood, South Dakota, was added to the list of editors. Whipple, a Sioux who was ordained deacon in 1917, became administrator of the Santee Mission in 1930. 5 Rouillard was replaced about the same time by P. C. Brugier of Martin, South Dakota.

At the beginning of 1930, the paper moved once more to Santee, Nebraska, where it was published by Charles R. Lawson and, later, by Millard M. Fowler. Editorial offices were in Mission, South Dakota. Barbour was the editor at Mission, and Cyril C. Rouillard (Sioux) was editor at Pierre. The Dakota material remained much as it had been for years. But in 1934 some English-language items began to appear once more, and from that point increased so that most of the publication was in English by late 1937.

For over a decade, there had been evidence that Anpao was on the decline. In 1919, the editors began to publish once every two months. Beginning in 1926, they published eight or nine times yearly, and in 1935, seven. It ceased publication, apparently in late 1937 or early 1938. Anpao was one of the longest surviving native-language periodicals in America.


Notes
1.
Indian Tribes and Missions ( Hartford: The Church Missions Publishing Company, 1926), 23.
2.
James Constantine Pilling, Bibliography of the Siouan Languages ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1887), 19-21, 69.
3.
Kenneth Walter Cameron (ed.), American Episcopal Clergy ( Hartford: Transcendental Books, 1970), "Ordinations by Bishops of the American Church, 1885-1895," 20 and [ 1895- 1898], 9; Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve, That They May Have Life: The Episcopal Church in South Dakota, 1859-1976 ( New York: The Seabury Press, 1977), 27.
4.
Cameron (ed.), American Episcopal Clergy, [ 1895- 1898], 2; Sneve, That They May Have Life, 27.
5.
Sneve, That They May Have Life, 27, 36.

Information Sources

Bibliography: Frederick W. Hodge (ed.), Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1910), 2: 232; James ConstantinePilling

-27-

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American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Conclusion xxxi
  • GUIDE TO INFORMATION SOURCES IN THE ENTRIES xxxiii
  • A 3
  • Note 4
  • Note 5
  • Note 6
  • Note 9
  • Notes 18
  • Note 20
  • Note 23
  • Notes 27
  • Notes 30
  • Notes 32
  • Notes 34
  • Note 37
  • B 39
  • Notes 40
  • Notes 42
  • Note 43
  • C 47
  • Notes 49
  • Note 51
  • Note 55
  • Notes 58
  • Notes 73
  • Notes 79
  • Notes 81
  • Note 82
  • Notes 84
  • Notes 91
  • Notes 94
  • Notes 97
  • Note 98
  • Notes 102
  • Notes 103
  • Notes 104
  • Notes 107
  • Note 109
  • Note 111
  • Notes 116
  • Notes 120
  • D 123
  • Notes 124
  • Notes 125
  • Notes 127
  • Notes 131
  • E 133
  • Notes 134
  • F 137
  • Notes 138
  • G 141
  • Notes 141
  • H 143
  • Note 143
  • Notes 147
  • I 151
  • Notes 162
  • Note 167
  • Notes 168
  • Note 170
  • Notes 171
  • Note 172
  • Note 173
  • Notes 176
  • Note 180
  • Note 185
  • Notes 189
  • Notes 195
  • Notes 200
  • Notes 204
  • Note 209
  • Notes 213
  • Notes 216
  • Note 219
  • Notes 220
  • Notes 224
  • Notes 229
  • Notes 231
  • Note 234
  • Notes 241
  • Notes 245
  • L 247
  • M 249
  • Note 250
  • Note 251
  • Note 255
  • Note 256
  • Note 259
  • Note 260
  • Note 263
  • Notes 264
  • Notes 266
  • N 267
  • Notes 269
  • Notes 270
  • Note 273
  • Notes 277
  • O 279
  • Note 289
  • Notes 292
  • Notes 295
  • P 297
  • Notes 300
  • Notes 301
  • Notes 303
  • Q 305
  • Note 306
  • Note 307
  • R 309
  • Note 312
  • Notes 316
  • Notes 320
  • Notes 325
  • S 327
  • Note 328
  • Notes 329
  • Notes 330
  • Notes 332
  • Note 334
  • Note 335
  • Notes 337
  • Notes 338
  • Note 340
  • Note 343
  • Notes 346
  • Notes 347
  • Note 349
  • Notes 352
  • T 355
  • Notes 356
  • Note 361
  • Note 363
  • Notes 369
  • V 371
  • Notes 372
  • Notes 375
  • Note 377
  • W 379
  • Notes 380
  • Notes 382
  • Notes 384
  • Note 386
  • Notes 389
  • Notes 394
  • Notes 398
  • Notes 399
  • Note 402
  • Note 406
  • Notes 407
  • Y 409
  • SUPPLEMENTAL LIST OF TITLES 411
  • APPENDIX A LIST OF TITLES BY CHRONOLOGY 425
  • APPENDIX B LIST OF TITLES BY LOCATION 431
  • APPENDIX C LIST OF TITLES BY TRIBAL AFFILIATION OR EMPHASIS 439
  • Index 447
  • About the Authors 483
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