American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

tinued the strong advocacy for education, hard work, and material "success." However, he began to publish more articles on current and controversial subjects such as the White Earth allotment, timber purchases, pending Indian legislation, and removal of restrictions from sale of allotments. He also reprinted more exchange material, much of which concerned Indian lore, news of Indians in other regions, anecdotal matter, and informational pieces on general interest topics. He also added a regular column of clipped material from TheTomahawk,* published at White Earth.

Publication of The Chippeway Herald was suspended in the fall of 1906. At that time the offices of agent and superintendent of the White Earth Boarding School were abolished. Agent Simon Michelet became superintendent and special disbursing agent, and the superintendent's position became that of principal, which was filled by Leonidas L. Goen, formerly at the Genoa, Nebraska, school where he edited and managed The Indian News.* Goen revived the Herald in January, 1907, and became the editor, while John J. Webster continued as manager and printer. Goen promised to offer "good wholesome reading of a general nature."

That was exactly what he did. Besides the personal and local columns, he reprinted exchange material from other Indian school papers and featured articles on different tribes and Indian personalities. He editorially urged hard work, honesty, and education and mounted an anti-tobacco campaign. Under Goen's editorship, the format was the same as it had been under Lipps and Davis.

The Chippeway Herald probably ceased publication with the May/June, 1909, issue.


Notes
1.
Lipps later served as District Supervisor of Indian Schools ( 1909- 1914, 1926- 1931), superintendent at Carlisle ( 1914- 1917), Supervisor of Indian Schools ( 1917- 1920), superintendent of the Nez Perce Agency ( 1920- 1926), superintendent at the Chemawa, Oregon, school ( 1927- 1931), superintendent of the Sacramento Agency ( 1931- 1935), and field representative of the U.S. Indian Service ( 1935- 1937), after which he retired. Lipps was author of numerous articles and books on Indians and the Indian Service. Who Was Who in America with World Notables ( Chicago: Marquis--Who's Who, 1973), 5: 434.
2.
March Wood to O. H. Lipps, March 30, 1904, Chilocco-Print Shop, Archives Division, Oklahoma Historical Society.
3.
W. A. Lufkins to S. M. McCowan, February 2, 1903, ibid.; The Tomahawk, December 4, 1903, and January 1, 1904.

Information Sources

Bibliography: None

Index Sources: None

Location Sources: DSI-BAE; MnHi


Publication History

Title and Title Changes: The Chippeway Herald ( 1902- 1909)

Volume and Issue Data: The Chippeway Herald (Vol. 1, No. 1, January, 1902-Vol. 8, No. 9/10, May/June, 1909)

-102-

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