American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

Publisher and Place of Publication: Chieftain Publishing Company, Vinita, Cherokee Nation ( 1891)

Editor: John L. Adair ( 1891)


THE DAILY INDIAN JOURNAL

The Daily Indian Journal was established on October 17, 1876, at Muskogee, Creek Nation, as an extra edition of the weekly Indian Journal.* During the last quarter of the nineteenth century, it was a common phenomenon of newspapers in the Indian Territory to publish daily or tri-weekly papers for the duration of special events, such as the convening of the Indian national councils. In the case of the Journal, the special event was the Indian International Fair at Muskogee.

The purpose was to report the daily events of the fair, a rather sensational event in the Indian Territory in 1876. The newspaper provided its readers with descriptive sketches of the fair, synopses of speeches, news about persons attending the fair, schedules of events, and other news of interest from the town and surrounding area, including the violence. It also contained one column in Choctaw print and two columns in Creek.

The first editors of The Daily Indian Journal were William Potter Ross and Myron P. Roberts. Ross, a Cherokee, was born at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, on August 20, 1820, the son of John and Eliza ( Ross) Ross. Educated first at Presbyterian mission schools and at schools in Tennessee and New Jersey, he attended Princeton, from which he graduated in 1842. He served in various Cherokee national offices before the Civil War, during which he served in the Confederate Army. After the war, he was principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, 1866-1867 and 1872-1875. His previous newspaper experience was work as editor of The Cherokee Advocate* from 1844 to 1848. Roberts, Ross' co-editor, was born at Riders Mills, New York, on April 18, 1831. He had been in the wholesale and retail drug business at Chicago and at Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin, before going to Muskogee in 1874. 1

The only known copies of The Daily Indian Journal are from the fall of 1876. It was apparently revived in October, 1878; October, 1880; September, 1881; September 1886. It was also published during 1902 and 1903. 2


Notes
1.
Ross died at Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation, on July 20, 1891. Roberts died at Muskogee on December 4, 1881, and the Indian Journal was published by his sons, L. H. and R. M. Roberts. John Bartlett Meserve, "Chief William Potter Ross," Chronicles of Oklahoma, 15 ( March, 1937), 21-29; The Indian Journal, December 8, 1881.
2.
Winifred Gregory (ed.), American Newspapers, 1821-1936: A Union List of Files Available in the United States and Canada ( New York: H. W. Wilson Co., 1937), 564: The Indian Journal, September 30, 1886, August 4 and September 11, 1903; Carolyn Thomas Foreman , Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1936), 184.

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 486

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.