American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview
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In format, the Review varied in size but consisted of four pages in each issue with two columns of print. It was suspended from May until December, 1916, and it is uncertain how long it continued. However, it was published as late as February, 1917. Like many other publications, it may have been an economic casualty of World War I.


Information Sources

Bibliography: None

Index Sources: None

Location Sources: NdHi


Publication History

Title and Title Changes: Fort Totten Review ( 1911- 1917)

Volume and Issue Data: Fort Totten Review (Vol. 1, No. 1, February, 1911-Vol. 6, No. 7, February, 1917)

Publisher and Place of Publication: Fort Totten Indian School, Fort Totten, North Dakota ( 1911-1917)

Editor. Charles M. Ziebach ( 1911- 1917)


FOSTER'S INDIAN RECORD AND HISTORICAL DATA

Foster's Indian Record and Historical Data was published at Washington, D.C., in three numbers between November 30, 1876, and March 1, 1877. It was edited by Dr. Thomas Foster, a collector and historiographer for the Office of Indian Affairs. 1

For some time, Foster had received an annual congressional appropriation through the Office of Indian Affairs to collect statistics and historical data regarding Indians, with the object of creating an Indian encyclopedia in the form of tribal monographs. Foster was directed to present copies of his material for examination before the publication of the first monograph, and he decided to set it up in the form of a four-page, four-column newspaper.

The content reflects the encyclopedic intent. Though not alphabetized, short articles contained sketches of tribes, commenting on their history and present condition. He reprinted "The Ioway Monograph" and "The Winnebago Monograph."2 There were also articles on terms related to the Indian, lists of vocabulary, Foster's "universal" Indian alphabet, Indian place names, and individuals. In its form, the short-lived publication could well have served as a model for later handbooks to North American Indians.

In producing his paper, Foster relied on native translators from several tribes.


Notes
1.
Foster edited the short-lived Old Whig at Bladensburg, Maryland, in 1878.
2.
"The Ioway Monograph" was reprinted in 1911 as The Iowa.

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