American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

M

THE MARTIN MESSENGER

The Martin Messenger was a weekly newspaper established at Martin, South Dakota, on February 25, 1911. Because of a lack of extant copies, the early history of the publication is obscure. It was owned in 1914 by William Healey, who at that time sold a half interest in the paper to William G. Pugh. Pugh, who was about twenty-two at the time, was three eighths Sioux and had graduated from Sherman Institute in Riverside, California, where he had gained journalistic experience as student editor of the paper, The Sherman Bulletin.* In 1917, The Martin Messenger absorbed the Bennett County Booster, established at Martin in 1911. 1

By 1922, The Martin Messenger was published by the Messenger Publishing Company, owned by William and L. Fern Pugh. The Pughs edited the paper and styled the eight-page, five-column weekly the "legal and official" newspaper of Bennett County and independent in politics. It was in most ways a typical small-town paper, containing local news of the week, farm news, some national news, and a large amount of filler. It also contained legal notices, notices of land sales, and tax lists. Besides the news items relating to the local Indian population, the Pughs published news of Indian affairs, legislation, and other matters concerning Indians. In some respects, the Messenger was a booster paper, supporting the economic growth of Bennett County.

In early 1927, a merger was apparently attempted with the Hot Springs Star. Francis H. Case became the publisher and L. Fern Pugh the editor, William G. Pugh announcing that he was leaving the newspaper business after sixteen years to enter the "electrical business." By that summer, however, the Messenger Publishing Company was once more the owner, and the Pughs were editors. By

-249-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 486

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.