American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

toms. The second category of content was information relating to such topics as other tribes and tribal leaders, ancient Indian art, and temperance among the Indians. A third category consisted of interesting information about such topics as western scenery, the fur trade, and Mexican civilization. Finally, the magazine contained many topical poems as well as didactic verse and essays written in the literary mode of the day.

Much of the content was supplied by Schoolcraft, and many pieces were written by his wife. Much of the Ojibwa lore was supplied by Mrs. Schoolcraft's brother George Johnston and their mother, the daughter of Waub Ojeeg, a well- known Ojibwa leader. Part of the content appeared later in Schoolcraft Algic Researches and other works. 3 The research reflected in the pages of The Muzzinyegun laid the groundwork for later ethnological studies for which Schoolcraft is best known today. 4


Notes
1.
Philip P. Mason, "Introduction," The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun ( East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1962), xiv, xv, xxvi. Vernon Kinietz, "Schoolcraft's Manuscript Magazines," Bibliographical Society of America Papers, 35 ( April- June, 1941), 153, says that the magazine was still being published in 1829.
2.
Mason, "Introduction,"xx, xxiii-xxiv.
4.
Schoolcraft's best-known work is Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Conditions, and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States, 6 vols. ( Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo and Company, 1851- 1857).

Information Sources

Bibliography: Vernon Kinietz, "Schoolcraft's Manuscript Magazines," Bibliographical Society of America Papers, 35 ( April-June, 1941), 151-154; Philip P. Mason, "Introduction and Notes", The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun ( East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1962)

Index Sources: Philip P. Mason (ed.), The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun ( East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1962), 185-193

Location Sources: DLC; Danky and Hady. Reprint: Philip P. Mason (ed.), The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun ( East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1962)


Publication History

Title and Title Changes: The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager ( 1827); The Muz- ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager ( 1827); The Literary Voyager ( 1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager ( 1827)

Volume and Issue Data: The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager (No. 4, January 12, 1827-No. 11, ? 1827); The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager (No. 12, March 2, 1827); The Literary Voyager (No. 13, March 10, 1827-No. 14, April 11, 1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (No. 16, April 28, 1827)

Publisher and Place of Publication: Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan ( 1826- 1827)

Editor: Henry Rowe Schoolcraft ( 1826- 1827)

-266-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 486

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.