American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

Wah-shah-she News,* both of which had been closed by the agent. He printed stories about traders and grazing leases, but the editorials ceased. More local news and Osage news appeared: annuity payments, weddings, obituaries, land assessments, the mixed-blood convention. In the fall of 1901, Peters published as a column in the back pages "The Eclipse" (Volume 1, Numbers 22-28), the school paper of the St. Joseph's Boarding School. It contained news from both the boys' and girls' homes. Student editors were Ella Labadie and Luther Elkins, and associate editors were James Tayrian and Francis Little Soldier.

In early 1902, William Murdock and Roy F. Timmons became the editors. Their primary purpose was the "upbuilding of the reservation and the advance- ment of its interests." Murdock soon resigned and left the editorship to Timmons. A staunch Democrat, he published more political news but continued to publish Osage news. The works of Indian writers like Harry Kohpay, Carlos Montezuma, and Charles Gibson began to appear. Murdock returned as editor in May and was replaced by Timmons again in July. Timmons was editor until October, 1902.

At that time Charles Peters returned as editor. He published Volume 1, Number 1, of "The Eclipse," which gave news of the boarding school. Peters' editorship was dominated this time by regional economic news and by the pro-statehood movement. He continued to publish large amounts of Osage and Kaw news and published frequent articles about the use of mescal.

The office of The Osage Journal burned in May or June of 1903, and the paper was printed for a few weeks at Wichita, Kansas. It ceased at the end of July and was revived again in December, 1904, by the Osage Publishing Company. The new publishers published little Indian news and stood for "allotment, progression, and individualization" of tribal assets.

The Journal continued as a weekly publication until 1960.


Note
1.
"Timothy John Leahy," Chronicles of Oklahoma, 12 ( June, 1934), 240.

Information Sources

Bibliography: Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1936)

Index Sources: None

Location Sources: Danky and Hady; Gregory


Publication History

Title and Title Changes: The Osage Journal ( 1897- 1960)

Volume and Issue Data: The Osage Journal (Vol. 4, No. 4, January 3, 1901-Vol. 6, No. 27, December 10, 1904)

Publisher and Place of Publication: W. C. Bridwell ( 1897), Timothy J. Leahy ( 1901- 1903), Osage Publishing Company ( 1904), Pawhuska, Osage Reservation

-289-

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