American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview
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Through letters, missionaries engaged in running theological disputes; there were always earnest but friendly arguments. Clergy also contributed historical essays on subjects such as the history of Methodism and Methodism among the Indians. News from missionary schools, the column from Harrell Institute, and locals from Seminole Academy, Chickasaw Academy, Pierce Institute, and the New Hope Seminary were published.

Items of interest for the Indian readers included columns written in Creek, Chickasaw, and Choctaw. Translations of hymns into the native languages doubtless carried the twin purposes of inspiring the people and displaying the handicraft of the missionary-translators to their colleagues and superiors. Lessons from Smith's Catechism were also printed in Creek.

From the beginning, Our Brother in Red carried advertising, most of it local, and all of it compatible with the tastes of its readers. No "questionable" advertising--for corsets or patent medicines, for example--was accepted.

For a decade after Brewer left the editorship, the publication moved frequently. Brewer was succeeded as editor in July, 1891, by W. M. Baldwin. J. W. Baldwin became assistant editor at this time. In November, the Reverend F. M. Moore, a Methodist Episcopal, South, preacher from Arkansas, became editor and continued for some years. In March, 1893, he changed the title to The Indian Methodist. This change was probably the result of a long-term discussion about the appropriateness of the periodical's name. Arguments for and against retaining the title had appeared from time to time almost from the beginning of the publication. At any rate, the name change was short-lived because Our Brother in Red returned to the nameplate in November, 1893. Moore moved the periodical to South McAlester, Choctaw Nation, in 1895, and in January, 1897, to Ardmore, Chickasaw Nation, where it remained until January, 1898, when it traveled back to South McAlester. At this time, Theodore Brewer resumed the task of editing the weekly. In 1899, Our Brother in Red was sold to the Reverend J. H. Lovett and moved to. Oklahoma City. The paper merged with the Arkansas Methodist of Little Rock in 1900; the combined publication was thenceforth known as the Indian Oklahoma Methodist. 2


Notes
1.
"Theodore F. Brewer," Chronicle of Oklahoma, 6 ( June, 1928), 232-233; Theo F. Brewer to Samuel Checote, July 20, 1882, Creek--Harrell Institute, 36100, Archives Division, Oklahoma Historical Society.
2.
Grace Ernestine Ray, Early Oklahoma Newspapers ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1928), 77-78.

Information Sources

Bibliography: Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1936); James Constantine Pilling, Bibliography of the Muskhogean Languages ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1889); Grace Ernestine Ray, Early Oklahoma Newspapers ( Norman: University of Okla

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