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American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

Bee,* the Weekly California Express,* the Daily National Democrat, and the San Francisco Evening Journal before becoming editor of the Herald.

On July 12, 1861, the Union Democratic State Central Committee adopted the Herald as the official organ of the party. Ridge was the party's candidate for state printer, and he was loyal to party doctrine, which was anti-secession, anti-Republican, but pro-Union and pro-slavery. He wanted no compromise with the Confederacy, he disliked Abraham Lincoln, he attacked opposition newspapers and editors, and he defended the Union Democratic candidates.

Although much of the newspaper's content dealt with party politics, Ridge published news items relative to Indian affairs and appended his editorial comments. He wrote editorials on the position of the Cherokees and the other tribes in the Indian Territory in the civil conflict. He argued prophetically that the tribes could not afford to sever their ties with the United States, but he feared that the Confederates would convince them, because of their slaveholding status, that their sympathies should lie with the Confederacy.

After the election on September 4, 1861, the political content greatly declined. Apparently having done what he was hired to do--to be the editor through the volatile political campaign--Ridge resigned on September 23. He closed with the hope that the turmoil of the campaign could be buried and with an expression of his pride to be among those who opposed "sectionalism of the North as the mad Ultraism of the South."

During his editorship, Ridge edited both the daily and the weekly Herald.


Note
1.
Ridge edited other newspapers before his death on October 5, 1867. Edward Everett Dale , "John Rollin Ridge," Chronicles of Oklahoma, 4 ( December 1926), 312-316; Carolyn Thomas Foreman, "Edward W. Bushyhead and John Rollin Ridge, Cherokee Editors in California," Chronicles of Oklahoma, 14 ( September, 1936), 299-302.

Information Sources

Bibliography: None

Index Sources: None

Location Sources: Gregory


Publication History

Title and Title Changes: The San Francisco Herald ( 1850-1862)

Volume and Issue Data: The San Francisco Herald (Vol. 11, No. 181, January 1, 1861- Vol. 12, No. 98, September 24, 1861)

Publisher and Place of Publication: G. W. Guthrie, San Francisco, California ( 1861)

Editor: John Rollin Ridge ( 1861)


SCHOOL NEWS

School News, a monthly publication issued at Carlisle Indian Industrial School, was edited by American Indian students soon after the founding of the school.

-335-

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