American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview

takeover of territorial schools, negotiation and passage of the Curtis Act, and negotiation of the Cherokee Agreement of 1902.

R. M. McClintock edited the Leader from 1904 to 1906, when Amos once more became editor and H. H. Harris became business manager. Amos had at first leased the Leader from Hill. Amos and Harris then bought the Leader Printing Company and published the newspaper until 1919. Before Oklahoma statehood in 1907, the Leader chronicled the last days of the Indian governments in the Indian Territory and the political events related to statehood. After statehood, Indian materials were incidental, not common. The emphasis, instead, was on news of Vinita, Craig County, and the state of Oklahoma.

In 1919, Amos and Harris sold the Leader Printing Company to Willis F. Allen, publisher of the Vinita Daily Journal. Allen edited the Leader until July, 1929, when it was consolidated with the Craig County Gazette. The newspaper was owned by the East Oklahoma Publishing Company, with Gould Moore, president, Charles O. Frye (a Cherokee), vice-president, and I. H. Nakdimen, secretary-treasurer. 4 John DeVine was editor. In 1929, Allen revived The Weekly Chieftain,* which had suspended about 1912, and as the result of a series of mergers the Leader took on the volume numbers of the Chieftain. It was published briefly as the Leader-Gazette; and then as The Vinita Leader, it was published until October 29, 1959, when it merged with the Craig County Democrat.


Note
1.
Frazee ( 1838- 1906) married Susan T. Daniel, daughter of Robert R. and Ann Daniel. H. F. O'Beirne and E. S. O'Beirne, The Indian Territory ( St. Louis: C. B. Woodward Company, 1892), 148-149.
2.
Hill was the son of George W. and Rachel (Davis) Hill. His wife was Frances E. Parks. From 1897 to 1903, Hill was cashier at the Vinita National Bank. In 1903 he became manager of a wholesale grocery company. From 1905 to 1916 he was president of the Vinita National Bank. He died at Vinita on May 24, 1942. R. L. Williams, "Davis Hill, 1863-1942," Chronicles of Oklahoma, 21 ( June, 1943), 109-110; Davis Hill, Interview, November 15, 1937, Indian-Pioneer History, Archives Division, Oklahoma Historical Society, 60: 106-111.
3.
Amos was one of the organizers of the Oklahoma Historical Society and served as its first president. He died on January 9, 1943. Daily Oklahoman, January 27, 1943; Hallie C. Wimer, Interview, May 25, 1937, Indian-Pioneer History, Archives Division, Oklahoma Historical Society, 67: 391-399.
4.
Frye was the son of Charles Oliver and Sadie (Quesenbury) Frye. Nakdimen was formerly a banker at Eufaula, Oklahoma.

Information Sources

Bibliography: Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1936)

Index Sources: None

Location Sources: Gregory

-377-

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