American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview
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THE WAH-SHAH-SHE NEWS

The Wah-shah-she News, a weekly newspaper, was established apparently in September, 1893, at Pawhuska, Osage Reservation. The founders were George Edward Tinker and a man named Regnier. Tinker, who was part Osage, was born September 24, 1868, at Osage Mission (presently St. Paul), Kansas, and spent his life in the Osage country. 1 In 1894 he was a member of the Osage Council from Strike Axe District. After only two months, Regnier left the paper, and it came under the proprietorship of Tinker and Timothy John Leahy, both of whom were listed as editors. Leahy, who was white, had also been born in 1868 at Osage Mission, Kansas, the son of an Irish merchant. He had attended Kansas common schools and in 1889 had graduated from the State Normal School at Fort Scott. He taught school, studied law, practiced in Neosho County, and then moved to Pawhuska, where he continued to practice law for the rest of his life. He married Bertha L. Rogers, an Osage, and became an Osage citizen by marriage. 2

The Wah-shah-she News contained eight pages of six columns each. Under the management of Tinker and Regnier, it contained only one page of local matter, but under Tinker and Leahy, the local content was expanded to three pages. The rest was advertisement, filler material, and news from outside the Indian Territory. Local news consisted of articles on such matters as allotment of land (which the paper favored), various Indian commissions, Catholic schools on the reservation, Fourth of July celebrations, and the political struggle between the fullblood and half-blood Osages. There were columns of chatty local and personal news not only from Pawhuska but also from outlying settlements such

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