American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview
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subject of his editorials was the political situation in Kansas. Ridge's political views placed him in the so-called Anti-Lecompton Democratic camp, which opposed the Lecompton constitution that would have admitted Kansas as a slave state. His views may explain his leaving the Express in August, 1858, to become editor of the Marysville Daily National Democrat.

The Express was moved to Sacramento in 1866 and ceased publication in July, 1867.


Note
1.
Edward Everett Dale, "John Rollin Ridge," Chronicles of Oklahoma, 4 ( December, 1926), 312-316; Carolyn Thomas Foreman, "Edward W. Bushyhead and John Rollin Ridge, Cherokee Editors in California," Chronicles of Oklahoma, 14 ( September, 1936), 299-302.

Information Sources

Bibliography: None

Index Sources: None

Location Sources: Gregory


Publication History

Title and Title Changes: Weekly California Express ( 1857-1859)

Volume and Issue Data: Weekly California Express (n.s., Vol. 2, No. 6, November 7, 1857-Vol. 4, No. 4, October 29, 1859)

Publisher and Place of Publication: W. F. Hicks & Company, Marysville, California ( 1857-1859)

Editor: John Rollin Ridge ( 1857-1859)


THE WEEKLY CAPITAL

The Weekly Capital began as the Telephone at Tahlequah, capital of the Cherokee Nation, on June 10, 1887. The founder of the four-page, five-column newspaper was B. H. Stone, a native of Kentucky, a photographer, and an attorney whose wife was a Cherokee. As editor and publisher, Stone claimed that his purpose was to support "education, progress and the advancement of the Cherokee Nation and its whole people regardless of race or color." His motto was "United We Stand, Divided We Fall." Stone believed that the young men of the country should be made fit to take control of the country after the nation's demise. He promised that the paper would support government, home manufactures, and the arts and sciences, and it would be a medium of information for those areas as well as for farming information.

Much of the news Stone reported was political, e.g., meetings of the Downing and National political parties, campaign events, attempts of the Cherokee freedmen to establish their rights in the nation, and the issue of Cherokee citizenship. He carried as well local news of Tahlequah and vicinity and news of educational

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