American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 - Vol. 1

By Daniel F. Littlefield Jr.; James W. Parins | Go to book overview
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Editor. Alfred Longley Riggs ( 1884- 1916); Frederick B. Riggs and Olive W. Riggs ( 1916- 1922); Frederick B. Riggs ( 1922- 1933); Rudolf Hertz ( 1933- 1936); Millard M. Fowler ( 1936- 1937)


A WREATH OF CHEROKEE ROSE BUDS

A Wreath of Cherokee Rose Buds was a small three-column literary newspaper of eight pages, issued first as Cherokee Rose Buds at the Cherokee Female Seminary near Park Hill, Cherokee Nation. During the 1853-1854 school year, it was supposedly published "at stated periods," but by 1855 it was advertised as being published at the close of each school session.

In 1854 the newspaper was edited by Cherokee students Catharine Gunter and Nancy E. Hicks and in 1855 by Elizabeth Annie Duncan and Lucinda M. Ross. 1

Devoted to "The Good, the Beautiful and the True," the paper contained original poems and prose by the students of the seminary, who signed the pieces with Cherokee names, initials, or pen names. Articles treated subjects such as Indian traditions, Cherokee education, scenes and routines at the Female Seminary, the famous Cherokee Sequoyah, beauty, nature, and intemperance. There were also notations of local events: temperance meetings, eclipse of the sun, celebration of the school's anniversary, and marriages. Some columns in Cherokee print appeared in each issue.

How long the publication continued is uncertain. Because of a lack of funds, the seminary closed at the end of the fall term of the 1856-1857 school year. It did not reopen until several years after the Civil War. 2


Notes
1.
Catharine Gunter married D. H. Ross, and Nancy Hicks married a man named Boynton. Elizabeth A. Duncan graduated from the seminary in February, 1856. She married Isaac Brown Hitchcock. Lucinda M. Ross, who also graduated in February, 1856, married Charles Renatus Hicks. Emmet Starr, History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folk Lore ( Oklahoma City: Warden Company, 1921), 233.
2.
Carolyn Thomas Foreman reported in 1936 that she saw a privately owned copy of Volume 3, Number 2, dated February, 1867. It was eight pages and contained short stories, poetry, essays on right living, lists of teachers and students, and one article in Cherokee. Articles were signed with Cherokee names and initials. The editors were Mary Alberty and Sally Riley. Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835- 1907 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1936), 244. Foreman is probably in error. The date is likely February, 1857, after the close of the fall session. At the end of that session, the seminary closed and had not reopened by 1867, the date she lists.

Information Sources

Bibliography: Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835- 1907 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1936); Grace Ernestine Ray, Early Oklahoma Newspapers ( Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, 1928)

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