Ergonomics and Safety of Intelligent Driver Interfaces

By Y. Ian Noy | Go to book overview

The UK Code of Practice can be regarded as the domain of ISO TICS MMI standards in miniature, and enables an answer to be given to the two questions posed at the start of the review: Can standards be developed? Should standards be developed? First, it is not possible to provide concrete product or performance standards that will guarantee safe systems are developed. However, it is possible to produce standards that incorporate best practice and state-of-the-art knowledge, which can lead to improved design and identify clearly unsafe systems.

It is a mistake to hope to place standards at the same position on some scale of verisimilitude as natural laws of physics. Standards can be useful tools, even if they simply represent an informed consensus view. In many cases, standards are designed not to tell designers what to do, but how to do it. They should be presented in terms of the best possible advice that can be given at that point in time, and formulated to stimulate technological development rather than impede it. As such, the distinction between guidelines and traditional notions of standards is blurred, and will probably continue to be blurred in the domain of much of human factors and ergonomics. If a hard view of requiements for standards is taken, in which all methods, tools, and metrics could be demonstrated to have stood the test of time and meet all the criteria of scientific validity, then, in practice, little progress can be made.

TICS MMI is a rapidly moving, highly pragmatic domain. It has the added characteristic of involving humans in complex and potentially hazardous environments, and a history of poor designs emerging into the public arena. Because the consequences of poor design are potentially serious and, for the individual even catastrophic, there is an important role for standardization to encourage good design.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The author is grateful to Tom Dingus, Iowa University; Tsuneomi Yano, Zexel; and Peter Hancock, Minnesota University, for their contributions to the panel discussion that served as the stimulus for this chapter. Special acknowledgment is due to Anders Hallén of Volvo Car Corporation for his presentation and written material that has been drawn on in this review, and to Francois Hartemann of Renault and Gene Farber of Ford US who convene ISO TC22 SC13 WG8 and ISO TC204 WG13, respectively, and who are the driving forces behind the achievements of these groups.


REFERENCES

Commission of European Communities (CEC). ( 1990). "Council directive of 29 May 1990 on the minimum safety and health requirements for work with display screen equipment" (Fifth individual directive within the meaning of Article 16(1) of Directive 87/391/EEC).

-408-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ergonomics and Safety of Intelligent Driver Interfaces
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 432

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.