CHAPTER XIV
GREENLAND

A GREAT adventurer was Eric the Red. With his father, because they were implicated in a murder-suit, he had left his home in the Jaeder in Norway and fared to Iceland where he had settled and married; but here too ill-luck had attended him, and in 981 or 982 a stormy and quarrelsome sojourn ended in his being outlawed. Accordingly Eric prepared his ship for departure, telling his friends that it was his purpose to seek for the land that one GunnbjÖrn had sighted nearly a century ago when he had been driven far west past Iceland. This country, of which there was still talk, was Greenland, and thither Eric turned his prow when he put out to sea, intending to prove or disprove the tale of GunnbjÖrn's accidental discovery. The voyage was successful; he soon sighted the ice-bound eastern coast of Greenland, sailed south, rounded Cape Farewell, and following the ice to the north-west eventually found an opening through the floes and put in to land at a point on the west coast probably about the latitude of Cape Desolation; thence he explored many of the fjords in the search for a habitable district and spent his first winter at Ericsey which lies opposite the entrance to Ericsfjord not far from the modern Julianehaab. In the summer he explored large tracts of the western coast, giving names to many places that he visited, and the second winter he spent at Ericsholm near Cape Desolation; the next summer he explored northwards as far as the modern Unatok. Then he returned to Ericsey and penetrated inland up to the head of Ericsfjord, and the third winter he abode once more at Ericsey. The following summer he returned to Iceland.

DISCOVERY BY GUNNBJÖRN AND FIRST EXPLORATION BY ERIC THE RED

There he was soon involved again in the quarrels that had led to his being outlawed, and though he eventually patched up a peace with his principal enemy, he left Iceland the summer after his return with the express purpose of founding a colony in the new country west-over-sea, this being called by him Greenland for the reason that a good name might attract other

-361-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of the Vikings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.