Criminal Justice in Europe: A Comparative Study

By Phil Fennell; Christopher Harding et al. | Go to book overview
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Contributors
PETER ALLDRIDGE graduated from University College London ( 1978). He became a tutorial fellow ( 1979-80), then lecturer and senior lecturer in Cardiff Law School. He has given a dissertation on coercion and legal responsibility. He has done recent research on blackmail.
PETER BAAUW studied law at Utrecht University ( 1968); he became senior lecturer in criminal law and criminal procedure at Utrecht University; he gave a dissertation on pre-trial detention ( 1978). He is a part-time criminal lawyer in practice ( 1980- ); part-time judge at Utrecht district court ( 1985- ) and Amsterdam Court of Appeals ( 1992).
SANNEKE BERKHOUT-VAN POELGEEST studied law at Amsterdam University ( 1977); she was a law clerk at the Amsterdam district court ( 1977-1982) and a lecturer in criminal law and criminal procedure at Amsterdam University ( 1982-1988) and at Utrecht University since 1988. Her recent research subject is human rights and investigatory restrictions on suspects detained on remand.
ANNEMARIEKE BEUER studied law at Utrecht University ( 1986); she has been research associate ( 1988-92), lecturer in criminal law and criminal procedure at Utrecht University since 1992. A recent research subject was the intimidation of witnesses.
CHRISJE BRANTS studied journalism ( Utrecht, 1969), law, and criminology at Amsterdam University ( 1978-82); she became a research fellow in criminology on corporate crime ( 1982-4, University of Amsterdam), and has been lecturer in criminal law and criminal procedure at Utrecht University since 1984; her dissertation was on the social construction of fraud ( Amsterdam, 1991).
JEANNETTE BRUINS studied law at Utrecht University ( 1980); she became a law clerk at the Dutch Supreme Court ( 1981-1985), then lecturer in criminal law and criminal procedure at Utrecht University from 1985. She has done recent research on criminal law for juveniles.
CATHY COBLEY studied law at University College, Cardiff ( 1988); a former police officer, she has been lecturer in Criminal Law, Contract Law and the Law of Evidence at Cardiff Law School since 1988. Her recent research subjects include: child abuse and children as witnesses in criminal trials.
ALAN DAVENPORT studied law at the University of Hull ( 1989); he became tutor in the Department of Law at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth

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