Literacy as Involvement: The Acts of Writers, Readers, and Texts

By Deborah Brandt | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
Rhetorics of Involvement

On the night of October 22, 1986, the New York Mets beat the Boston Red Sox in the fourth game of the World Series to tie the series at two games each. The next day the New York Times published a feature story, "There's No Stopping Carter," by sports writer Ira Berkow, the first eight paragraphs of which appear below:

Boston, Oct. 22 -- After waiting 12 years to get into a World Series, Gary Carter is not about to allow a couple of sore knees, a single sore thumb, a "beat-up" left palm, a dollop of frustration, a soupçon of fatigue and assorted other maladies and inconveniences -- like the Boston Red Sox -- to interfere with his good time. (1)

This is Gary Carter's 12th full season in the big leagues, and only once, in 1981, had he ever before been in a championship series. He was catching for Montreal, which lost in the playoffs to the Dodgers. (2)

After the Mets lost the first two games of the World Series to the Red Sox, they came back to win Game 3 Tuesday night, 7-1, on the strength of, among other things, two clutch hits by Carter -- a double and a single, driving in three runs. (3)

Now, as the Mets went into Game 4, down 2 games to 1, he felt the team's chance against Al Nipper, the Red Sox starter, was strong. (4)

" Nipper hadn't pitched in any of the playoff games against California," said Carter, "and he had a high e.r.a. this season." Nipper's earned run average was 5.38 to go along with his 10-12 record. He said the Mets weren't "taking Nipper lightly, but the general consensus is that we can beat him." (5)

Carter said that John McNamara, the Red Sox manager, was starting Nipper because he didn't want to overwork his aces, Roger Clemens and Bruce Hurst. (6)

"If we win," the Mets' catcher said, "then it's 2-2 and anyone's series. Just the way it was for us against Houston." (7)

-81-

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