No Harm: Ethical Principles for a Free Market

By T. Patrick Burke | Go to book overview

Introduction

AMERICA'S CONDITION

After a struggle lasting some fifty years, a struggle waged whether by force of arms or by more peaceful means in almost every corner of the globe, the United States in the final decade of the twentieth century is witnessing the acknowledged triumph of the principles for which it has historically stood. In nation after nation dictatorship is in the process of being replaced by democracy, repression by freedom, and the stultification of planned economies by the dynamism of markets. With the collapse of communism in Eastern and Central Europe, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the abandonment of central planning even in China, America has become in many respects the model against which every nation must measure itself.

At the same time, however, the United States finds itself facing a host of formidable problems at home. Its economic power, which is the foundation of its military and political significance, has suffered a long- term decline relative to that of other nations, as shown especially in the weakness of its manufacturing industry, which has been saved in large part only by devaluing its dollar to less than half what it was thirty years ago. After four years the country is still struggling to emerge from a brutal recession which sent unprecedented numbers of businesses into bankruptcy, and rapidly increased unemployment. Its savings and loan system has been threatened with collapse, leading to an extremely expensive rescue by the federal government. Its system of public education, which consumes vast amounts of tax funds, is pervasively disappointing in its

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
No Harm: Ethical Principles for a Free Market
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Liberal Society 15
  • 2 - The Principle of Mutual Benefit 39
  • 3 - Is the Market Imperfect? 75
  • 4 - Economic Value 109
  • 5 - Causing Harm 121
  • 6 - The Individual and the Community 151
  • 7 - Justice and the Principle of No Harm 177
  • 8 - The Principle of No Harm II 207
  • 9 - The Principle of No Harm III 227
  • Notes 251
  • Bibliography 273
  • Index 283
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.