Trumpets of Jubilee: Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Lyman Beecher, Horace Greeley, P.T. Barnum

By Constance Mayfield Rourke | Go to book overview

Index
Abolition, Abolitionists, 57-9, 109, 179- 182, 268, 279, 280, 329
Adams, Charles Francis, 184, 187, 344, 346, 347
Adams, John Quincy, 247, 253, 381
Adams, Henry, 254.
Agrarians, Agrarianism, 268, 291
Albert, Prince Consort, 110, 124
Alcott, Bronson, 179
Aldrich, Mrs. Thomas Bailey, 131
American Union of Associationists, 296
Ames, Fisher, 10
Amherst College, 49, 153, 156
Andover Seminary, 82, 95, 106, 119
Andrews, Stephen Pearl, 196
Anthony, Susan B., 141, 192, 195, 198, 288, 310, 336
Anti-Puritan, 372, 373, 378, 381, 399. See also Puritan
Anti-Rent, 283
Anti-Slavery, Anti-Slavery Society, 58, 59, 72, 82, 109, 112, 161, 280, 316, 328 ( Glasgow), 112. See also Abolitionism, Abolitionists
Argyll, Duke and Duchess of, 113, 124
Arnold, Matthew, 131, 231, 425
Atchison, 181
Baker, George E., 325
Banner of Light. See Spiritualism
Barnaby Rudge, 264
Barnum, Charity Hallett (Mrs. P. T. Barnum), 374, 420
Barnum, P. T.: Anti_Puritan inheritance, youth in Bethel, Conn., 371-4; promotes lotteries, launches a newspaper, 374-6; in jail, and out of local favor, 373-80; after a triumphal march goes to New York, 379-80; Joice Heth, Anne Royall, circuses in Connecticut, tall tales in the West, science in New York, 380-88; buys the American Museum, 388-91; Feejee Mermaid, Buffalo Hunt, the Woolly Horse, the beginnings, of a circus and a theater, 391-401; Tom Thumb, the conquest of Europe, 401-5; a palace at Bridgeport, 405-6; Jenny Lind, 407-9; the circus again, and a literary salon, 409-13; clocks, a further invasion of Bridgeport, 413-16; financial failure, the omen of the whale, 416-419; the beginnings of the Greatest Show, 419-21; the monster circus, 421-4; the end, 426. See also114, 144, 178, 237, 242, 266, 338, 339, 342, 348, 429
Bates, Judge Edward, 326, 327, 328, 329
Beach, Moses Y., 260, 262
Beach, William A., 223
Beale, Lieutenant Edward F., 300
Beecher, Catherine, 17, 23, 24, 35, 48, 51, 78, 79, 90, 92, 94, 120, 125, 132
Beecher, Charles, 23, 77, 79, 82, 83, 89, 112
Beecher, David, 3, 5
Beecher, Edward, 17, 35, 47-50, 81
Beecher, Mrs. Edward, 104
Beecher, Esther (mother of Lyman Beecher), 3
Beecher, Esther (sister of Lyman Beecher), 22, 50, 90
Beecher, Eunice Bullard (Mrs. Henry Ward Beecher), 156, 157, 163, 164, 168, 190, 214, 215, 234-5
Beecher, George, 17, 35, 47, 78
Beecher, Harriet Porter ( Lyman Beecher's second wife), 34, 35, 51, 74, 84, 89
Beecher, Henry Ward: Youth, in Litchfield, at Amherst, at Lane Seminary, 152-5; slips outside his father's influence but enters the ministry, 153-55; marries Eunice Bullard, 156; at Lawrenceburg, Ind., 157-163; at Indianapolis, 157-163; goes to Brooklyn, 163; abroad, 166-7; art, nature, new doctrines, 167-173; Beecher and Whitman, 173-5; as an orator, 174-9; as a public leader, 179-84; the Civil War --Lincoln and Beecher, 183-4; English speeches, 184-7; reconstruction, 187-9; growing rivalry with Theodore Tilton, 189-90; rise of Beecher- Tilton affair against the background of the new feminism, 191-

-439-

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Trumpets of Jubilee: Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Lyman Beecher, Horace Greeley, P.T. Barnum
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Lyman Beecher 1
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe 87
  • Henry Ward Beecher 149
  • Horace Greeley 239
  • P. T. Barnum 367
  • Epilogue 427
  • A Note on Sources 435
  • Index 439
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