CHAPTER II
THE NATURE OF THE PROBLEM

Armament and Disarmament as Applied Science: Three Fundamental Questions: The Meaning of Disarmament: Is Disarmament Feasible?: What are the Reasoned Requirements?


ARMAMENT AND DISARMAMENT AS APPLIED SCIENCE

The study of armament is a branch of applied science. Although not such a sharply defined example as chemical industry, based on chemical science, or psycho-analysis, based on mental science, it possesses all the required characteristics. It has a specific technical objective, the operation of war, and, in reaching towards it, armament employs research activities in the different sciences which feed it, half-scale and large-scale investigations of a technical nature, and highly scientific processes of manufacture and application. The best analogy would perhaps be found in medicine, which is fairly regarded as a branch of applied science, even though it finds its roots and evolves its facts and methods of progress from a wide range of pure sciences.

Strictly speaking, disarmament is one of the problems of armament. The latter is an activity or development process which strives to build up and increase the quantity and efficiency of the methods of making war by violent means. Disarmament can be regarded somewhat loosely as the converse process--the reduction and reorganisation of armament to such a point that only certain types of hostilities are possible, and others are prevented. It follows that the scientific and technical characteristics of armament must to a certain extent govern disarmament, and be taken into consideration in dealing with it. Building science controls the erection of a great building, and cannot be ignored without fatal results in its demolition or structural reorganisation. This is a fairly close parallel, but peace provides singularly few, for the simple reason that we cannot afford to create huge and complex economic or industrial systems with the possibility that sooner or later they may have to be rooted out as vicious growths.

The broad question of disarmament is receiving the consideration of the official world, but, although the physical, moral, and

-21-

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