Style in Musical Art

By C. Hubert H. Bart Parry | Go to book overview

IX
NATIONAL INFLUENCES ON STYLE

THE general question of the influence of audiences on art has been considered. The more special question of the influence of the audiences of the various nations requires some little consideration before passing to the more intimate features of musical style in various departments.

The fact that different races have strongly marked differences of taste and talent in music is so aggressively obvious that it is almost superfluous to adduce arguments to prove it. Every one knows that Italians have a passion for vocal melody, that the German composers have out-distanced all others in instrumental music, that the French love ballet, and that the English people have a great and indomitable taste for the music of other nations. It also seems to people who think about it at all that there is an intimate connection between national character and the peculiar tastes of a nation. It is observed that a voluptuous and passionate style is favoured by a self-indulgent and sensuous people, a superficially pretty and neat style is cultivated by a gay people, a weighty and serious style by an intellectual and strenuous people, a placid style by a complacent and reticent people, a blatant style by a vain and egoistic

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Style in Musical Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I Forecast 1
  • Iii Simple Types of Instrumental Style 37
  • Iv Style in Music for the Domestic Keyed Instruments 53
  • V Elementary Complications of Style 72
  • Vi Form and Style 88
  • Vii Influence of Audiences on Style 106
  • Viii Influence of Audiences on Style 131
  • Ix National Influences on Style 152
  • X Texture I 173
  • Xi Texture 189
  • Xii Evolution of Thematic Material 209
  • Xiii Evolution of Thematic Material 228
  • Xiv the Sphere of Temperament 249
  • Xv Functions of Thematic Material 265
  • Xvi the Functions of Thematic Material II 289
  • Xvii Theory and Academicism 305
  • Xviii Antitheses 319
  • Xix Realistic Suggestion 335
  • Xx Quality I 373
  • Xxi Quality II 392
  • Appendix 429
  • Index 433
  • INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS 439
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