An Overland Journey from New York to San Francisco in the Summer of 1859

By Horace Greeley | Go to book overview

VI.
ON THE PLAINS.

Station 9, Pike's Peak Express Co.,

PIPE CREEK, May 28, 1859.

I WAS detained at Manhattan nearly a day longer than I had expected to be by high water. Wildcat, five miles west, and Rock Creek, seventeen miles east, were both impassable on Thursday, so that an express-wagon from Pike's Peak was stopped behind the former, while five mail-coaches and express-wagons faced each other through part of Thursday and all of Thursday night across the latter. Next morning, however, each stream had run out, so that they could be forded, and at one P. M. I took my seat in the Pike's Peak express, and again moved westward.

Our way was still along the United States military road, crossing Wildcat, now a reasonable stream, and winding for some miles over rugged, thin-soiled limestone hills, then striking down south-westward into the prairie bottom of the Kansas, which is as rich as land need be. A few miles of this brought us to Ogden, a land-office city of thirty or forty houses, some of them well built of stone. Just beyond this begins the Fort Riley reservation, a beautiful tract of prairie and timber stretching for four or five miles along the northern bank of the Kansas, and including the sad remains of Pawnee City, at which Gov. Reeder summoned the first (bogus)

-71-

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An Overland Journey from New York to San Francisco in the Summer of 1859
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Contents xv
  • Preface xvii
  • I. from New York to Kansas. 7
  • Ii. Notes on Kansas. 20
  • Iii. More Notes on Kansas. 35
  • Iv. More of Kansas. 50
  • V. Summing Up on Kansas. 61
  • Vi. on the Plains. 71
  • Vii. the Home of the Buffalo. 80
  • Viii. Last of the Buffalo. 86
  • Ix. the American Desert. 98
  • X Good-Bye to the Desert. 107
  • Xi. the Kansas Gold-Diggings. 115
  • Xii. the Plains--The Mountains. 128
  • Xiii. the Gold in the Rocky Mountains. 139
  • Xiv. "Lo! the Poor Indian!" 149
  • Xv. Western Characters. 157
  • Xvi. from Denver to Laramie. 166
  • Xviii. Laramie to South Pass. 182
  • Xviii. South Pass to Bridger. 190
  • Xix. from Bridger to Salt Lake. 198
  • Xxi. Two Hours with Brigham Young. 209
  • Xxii. the Mormons and Mormonism. 219
  • Xxiii. Salt Lake, and Its Environs. 230
  • Xxiv. the Army in Utah. 245
  • Xxv. Rom Salt Lake to Carson Valley. 258
  • Xxvi. Carson Valley--The Sierra Nevada. 275
  • 1xxvii. California Mines and Mining. 283
  • Xxviii. California--The Yosemite. 295
  • Xxix. California--The Big Trees. 310
  • Xxx. California Physically Considered. 322
  • Xxxi. California-Her Resources. 334
  • Xxxii. California-Summing Up. 344
  • Xxxii. California---Final Gleanings. 361
  • Xxxiv a Railroad to the Pacific. 368
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