The Life of Charlotte Brontë - Vol. 1

By E. C. Gaskell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X.

EARLY in March, 1841, Miss Brontë obtained her second and last situation as a governess. This time she esteemed herself fortunate in becoming a member of a kind-hearted and friendly household. The master of it, she especially regarded as a valuable friend, whose advice helped to guide her in one very important step of her life. But as her definite acquirements were few, she had to eke them out by employing her leisure time in needle-work; and altogether her position was that of "bonne" or nursery governess, liable to repeated and never-ending calls upon her time. This description of uncertain, yet perpetual employment, subject to the exercise of another person's will at all hours of the day, was peculiarly trying to one whose life at home had been full of abundant leisure. Idle she never was in any place, but of the multitude of small talks, plans, duties, pleasures, &c., that make up most people's days, her home life was nearly destitute This made it possible for her to go through long and deep histories of feeling and imagination, for which others, odd as it sounds, have rarely time. This made it inevitable that -- late on, in her too short career -- the intensity of her feelings should wear out her physical health. The habit of "making out," which had grown with her growth, and strengthened with her strength, had become a part of her nature. Yet all exercise of her strongest and most characteristic faculties was now out of the question. She could

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The Life of Charlotte Brontë - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Vol. I v
  • Life of Charlotte BrontË. 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 29
  • Chapter IV 51
  • Chapter V 67
  • Chapter VI 82
  • Chapter VII 105
  • Chapter VIII 122
  • Chapter IX 166
  • Chapter X 182
  • Chapter XI 198
  • Chapter XII 228
  • Chapter XIII 252
  • Chapter XIV 270
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