The Diplomatic Relations of the United States with the Barbary Powers, 1776-1816

By Arthur Alphonse Ekirch Jr. | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE idea of progress is one of those vague concepts which have been cherished, at least until recently, by a large portion of the modern occidental world. Formerly the subject of much philosophical theorizing by intellectuals, the idea in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has also penetrated to the generality of the people. It has been withdrawn from the exclusive scrutiny of the philosophers to become accepted as a part of the ideology of industrial civilization. Traditionally the idea has been advocated and believed in as a vision of the future, but it also has been invoked as a useful justification and rationalization for the events of the past. Lending itself to varied interpretations and to many uses, it has served divergent interests and classes.

While its influence has been generally recognized, the historical treatment of the idea of progress has been confined mostly to a discussion of the leading philosophical treatises on the subject. In this fashion the history of the idea in Europe has been outlined, but in the United States the literature of progress has been a subject of concern only with regard to its incidental or biographical aspects. The need for a more definite analysis of the American conception of the idea of progress was first indicated by Professor Charles A. Beard, in 1932, in his Introduction to the American edition of J. B. Bury's history of the idea in Europe. Since then it has received the attention of several students of American intellectual history, but no attempt has been made to present a thorough survey of the concept for any extended period of American history.1 This study, therefore, is an effort to portray the American faith in progress during an important period of our history and to analyze the idea in the terms of the interests and groups which it served or promised to serve.

____________________
1
However, since the completion of this study, the history of the complementary concept, the idea of civilization, has been published. See: Charles A and Mary R. Beard, The American Spirit: A Study of the Idea of Civilisation in the United States ( New York, 1942).

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Diplomatic Relations of the United States with the Barbary Powers, 1776-1816
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.