The Diplomatic Relations of the United States with the Barbary Powers, 1776-1816

By Arthur Alphonse Ekirch Jr. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER III
THE RESOURCES FOR MATERIAL EXPANSION

MUCH of the impetus for the idea of an American mission was provided by the tremendous resources available for material expansion and development in the United States during the period from 1815 to 1860. During these decades, before the Civil War and the final triumph of industrialism, progress in terms of material growth and accumulation was still evaluated with regard to the prosperity of mercantile capitalism. Expansion in this so-called Middle Period was not confined primarily to an intensive development of home industry, but the criteria of economic progress were also based on the rise of foreign commerce and on the speed with which the Great American West was exploited. During this period a great gain was made not only in the acquisition of new raw materials and markets but also in the rapid increase of the population. Expansion westward to the Pacific uncovered areas rich in natural resources, awaiting development by a growing population. To provide the necessary labor force, the large natural increase at home was augmented by the vast numbers of immigrants coming from Europe. Discouraged by the toils and privations of life in the Old World, they came to America in the hope of sharing in its abundant material resources. When the growing numbers of Catholic immigrants came to be considered a menace to American advancement, the religious interests in the United States rose to emphasize the Protestant nature of the national progress. Seemingly threatened by the wave of materialism, the church tempered its support of the new tendencies with an emphasis on moral progress. However, the Protestant churches also sent their missionaries after the pioneers and traders, and Christian people rejoiced that in an era of material progress the church was also making gains.

-72-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Diplomatic Relations of the United States with the Barbary Powers, 1776-1816
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?