The Economic Principles of European Integration

By Stephen Frank Overturf | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Factor Mobility and Tax Harmonization

A major aim of the establishment of the Common Market was full factor mobility. In this aim the Community was perceived as moving well beyond a narrow customs union and much closer to a real common market of goods, services, and factors of production, and perhaps toward economic union.


FACTOR MOBILITY

The free flow of labor within the Common Market was provided for in Article 48 of the Treaty of Rome (see Appendix), and indeed, this has been an area of real success in the Community. Only identity cards are needed to cross boundaries, no work permits are needed for Community workers, and residence permits are automatically renewable after five years. There is, of course, priority given to EC over non-EC workers, and the situation in West Germany of "temporary" (especially Turkish) workers has not always been harmonious. During the 1982-83 recession, for example, there were some unfortunate confrontations, and the situation has never been totally free from discord.

An initial concern regarding intra- EC migration was social security payments, especially retirement benefits. The concern was how to treat periods earned in the wage earner's previous country, and how to adjust payments for non-nationals. The decision was made in the liberal direction, with previous periods earned receiving full credit in the new country, and benefit treatment equal to nationals. The potential problem of resource reallocation created by such a liberal ruling is dealt with below, as it is essentially identical in nature to direct tax treatment between union countries.

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Economic Principles of European Integration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter 1 History of European Economic Integration 1
  • Chapter 2 Community Institutions 15
  • Chapter3 Customs Union Theory 21
  • Chapter 4 Factor Mobility and Tax Harmonization 35
  • Chapter 5 Monetary Union 46
  • Conclusion 59
  • Chapter 6 Industrial Policy 61
  • Chapter 7 Common Agricultural Policy 75
  • Conclusion 87
  • Chapter 8 Trade Relations: Developing Countries 89
  • Conclusion 101
  • Chapter 9 Trade Relations: More Developed Countries 102
  • Chapter 10 Regional Policy 118
  • Chapter 11 Social Policy 134
  • Conclusion 144
  • Appendix Treaty Establishing the European Economic Community 147
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 173
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 176

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.