The Deaf Child in the Family and at School: Essays in Honor of Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans

By Patricia Elizabeth Spencer; Carol J. Erting et al. | Go to book overview

in what they recommend to hearing parents. It seems clear, viewing the interactions, that the mothers respond to the states of their children on a moment to moment basis as they make decisions about when to signal and that these decisions may relate to their knowledge of the child's temperament and capabilities, as well as their own preferred styles of interacting.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am very grateful to Kay Meadow-Orlans, Rob MacTurk, Patricia Spencer, and Lynne Koester for the opportunity to have access to data collected under the grant and for a variety of different kinds of assistance "above and beyond." My particular thanks go to Patricia Spencer for her rare generosity in sharing her play data and for the pleasure of many stimulating discussions surrounding our joint interests.


REFERENCES

Adamson L., & Chance S. E. ( 1998). Coordinating attention to people, objects, and language. In A. M. Wetherby, S. F. Warren, & J. Reichle (Eds.), Transitions in prelinguistic communication (pp. 15-37). Baltimore: Paul Brookes.

Bakeman R., & Adamson L. ( 1984). "Coordinating attention to people and objects in mother-infant and peer-infant interaction". Child Development, 55, 1278-1289.

van den B. Bogaerde ( 1994). "Attentional strategies used by deaf mothers". In I. Ahlgren , B. Bergman, & M. Brennan (Eds.), Perspectives on sign language usage (pp. 305-317). Papers of the Fifth International Symposium on Sign Language Research (Vol. 2). Durham, England: University of Durham.

Butterworth G., & Grover L. ( 1990). "Joint visual attention, manual pointing, and preverbal communication in human infancy". In M. Jeannerod (Ed.), Attention and performance XIII. Motor representation and control (pp. 605-624). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Colombo J., Mitchell D. W., Coldren J. T., & Freeseman L. J. ( 1991). "Individual differences in infant visual attention: Are shorter lookers faster processors or feature processors?" Child Development, 62, 1247-1257.

Erting C. J., Prezioso C., & Hynes M. O'Grady ( 1990/ 1994). "The interactional context of deaf mother-infant communication". In V. Volterra & C. J. Erting (Eds.), From gesture to language in hearing and deaf children (pp. 97-106). Berlin, Germany: Springer Verlag ( 1990); Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press ( 1994).

Harris M., Clibbens J., Chasin J., & Tibbitts R. ( 1989). The social context of early sign language development. First Language, 9, 81-97.

Harris M., & Mohay H. ( 1997). "Learning to look in the right place: A comparison of attentional behavior in deaf children with deaf and hearing mothers". Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2, 95-103.

Koester L. S., Brooks L. R., & Traci M. A. ( 1996). Mutual responsiveness in deaf and hearing mother-infant dyads. Poster session presented at the biennial meeting of the International Conference on Infant Studies, Providence, RI.

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