Between Churchill and Stalin: The Soviet Union, Great Britain, and the Origins of the Grand Alliance

By Steven Merritt Miner | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A s is always the case with a first book, there are a great number of people to thank for their help, assistance, and encouragement during the research and writing of this work. In the first place, I would like to thank Professor F. L. Loewenheim, whose remark over dinner one evening led me to embark on this project and who gave invaluable advice and help at every stage of research and writing; I am deeply in his debt both for his kindness and for sharing some of his erudition with me. I must also thank Professor Gale Stokes, who showed enough faith to unleash me on this project; he, too, gave invaluable encouragement and support.

There are a great many people who read and commented on early versions of this work. Most notable among them are Professor Barbara Jelavich and Professor Robert F. Byrnes, both of whom read and suggested many alterations to the earlier, very rough drafts. Professor Charles Jelavich and Professor Yuri Bregel also read a portion of the manuscript and imparted many useful pieces of advice. My friends Hal Kosiba, James Felak, Sara Birtles, and Parris Hawkins also assisted me in many more ways than they know. To all of these people I am very grateful, and, though I owe to each of them many useful insights, all errors of omission or commission are of course entirely my own.

Most of all I should like to thank my families, to whom this book is dedicated. Both my own parents gave me unflinching support, even during the most difficult periods when my obsession must have been very tiring. I am particularly grateful to my mother, who not only typed two early drafts but also showed an almost inexplicable interest in the work itself. My inlaws also helped in countless ways, and I am especially grateful to James McMillan, my father-in-law, for the opportunity to draw on his deep knowledge of wartime Britain, which he shared with me in many memorable conversations.

Finally, I would like to thank my wife, Doreen, who endured a great deal of difficulty and uncertainty on my behalf. Without her support, I could not have achieved what little I have done. My daughter Emily, too, though fortunately for her still too young to be pressed into copyediting, has enriched both our lives and supported us without even knowing.

-ix-

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