Between Churchill and Stalin: The Soviet Union, Great Britain, and the Origins of the Grand Alliance

By Steven Merritt Miner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
THE EDUCATION OF SIR STAFFORD AUGUST-NOVEMBER 1940

T he tenor of Sir Stafford Cripps's audience with Stalin convinced all those privy to his account that Anglo-Soviet rapprochement would be difficult, if not impossible, to create. But Sir Stafford and the London government differed over what could or ought to be done to break the impasse. Cripps, on the one hand, believed that the British must prove to Stalin their reliability as a potential ally. He argued that a sweeping British gesture, the recognition by London of Soviet sovereignty over the Baltic States, would overcome the suspicion that the Soviet leaders held in their hearts about British intentions. Soviet distrust, Cripps believed, dated from British intervention against the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War and could only be overcome by a large British concession toward the needs of Soviet security.

The Foreign Office was considerably less optimistic than the ambassador about the prospects of quickly gaining Soviet trust. British diplomats believed, however, that, given enough patient effort and some luck, Britain could still exert some influence on the nature, if not the extent, of Soviet trade with Germany. The idea of using military measures to close the Soviet gap in the blockade of Germany had died with the fall of France. And Stalin had told Cripps quite clearly that he did not intend to stray from the conditions of the German-Soviet Trade Agreement of February. Therefore, the only option open to the British -- and it offered only a slim chance of success -- was to attempt to conclude their own trade deal with Moscow, buying those commodities most needed by the Germans.

In the meantime, the British continued to enforce their navicert system, searching Russian shipping for contraband goods that the Soviets were importing for transshipment to Nazi Germany. This policy had already led

-74-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Between Churchill and Stalin: The Soviet Union, Great Britain, and the Origins of the Grand Alliance
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 319

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.